Introducing Author D.S. Durden

Dragon Soul Press proudly presents a man of many talents, Author D.S. Durden! Multiple titles of sci-fi, fantasy, and horror will be coming soon. Be sure to keep an eye out for announcements!


What inspired you to start writing?

As a kid, I was always artistically-inclined, which ranged across many mediums. The English language was always my best subject in school and I had this uncanny ability to get significantly better at writing every time I took a long hiatus from it. Drawing was my focus for most of my life, but writing had the ability to convey things that my art couldn’t. Anywhere from big details to the more fiddly things—I can’t draw without also writing in some form or fashion. They work together in tandem and probably always will for me.

What comes first, the plot or characters?

It wildly depends on the story. Sometimes I’ll just be sitting in my house and come up with some amazing plot that randomly flashes through my mind and I immediately start taking some weird, vague notes. Other times, I’ll see something and the concept of a character starts brewing in my mind. However, most of the time, I create stories around cool characters I spontaneously made.DSD_logo_noshine3

What does success mean to you? What is the definition of success?

Success is the accomplishment of some goal or a general feeling of accomplishment, in my opinion. Realistically I’m pretty financially-driven and always have been, but I feel like money-success is a different beast that can run alongside the “other” success. I don’t have a name for the “other” success, but basically, I want to be able to create what I want, share it with others, and have my creations be genuinely well-loved. I feel like that’s the big thing. Money-success is always nice, but if I hate what I create, it pays for groceries but doesn’t feed my soul.

How much ‘world building’ takes place before you start writing?

Oh, gods…most of it. At best, I’ll write a few scenes, but I worldbuild obsessively and frequently get stuck in a story if I don’t have the general setting mapped out perfectly. It both makes me a better writer and stifles me, if I’m being honest. Sometimes I just want to write this cool fight scene, but I have to name the continent first because one character references it during the intense dialogue. It’s crazy.

Who is your favourite character?

Of my work or other people’s works? I’m a huge nerd so that’s gonna be left for another interview… As for my characters, definitely Daryn. He’s just this terribly troubled guy who’s gone through a bunch of really wild stuff but he always makes it by, either through his own power or by his close-knit circle. For a while he’s motivated by a lot of “salt” and spite, but it eventually transforms into a journey of progression and betterment. He starts taking the wrong path and he has to pull himself back out. He acknowledges the horrors in his mind and wants to do better than that. But Daryn’s not a hero. He’s just the protagonist of his own life.

How many plot ideas are just waiting to be written?

More than thirty but less than a hundred.

 

What famous author do you wish would be your mentor?

Admittedly, I don’t really read that much, so there’s no author I’m aware of that I’d want to be mentored by. However, I would love to sit down with Yoko Taro the director/scenario writer of the video game series Nier. I just want to ask him a million questions, pick his brain, and learn a thing or two. He’s quirky and kind of reclusive and I really relate to that.

Favourite artist and favourite song?

I follow a ton of artists online so it’s a very difficult question for me. But one that comes to mind is Boris Groh. I don’t know a lot about them, but their art is phenomenal, creepy, surreal, and kind of everything I want to embody in my more dark work. Just a bunch of bones, machines, and ominous creatures. Some of which look terrifying but kind of have this essence that maybe they aren’t so bad. I love that.
As for song, that’s probably the hardest question of all. My favorite song varies week to week. But musicians, I love Joji, Celldweller, and Excision. Those are my top three. I listen to a lot of electronic, drum & bass, and lo-fi hip-hop.

If you had to describe yourself in three words, what would they be?

Weird. Creative. Outcast.

Where can readers find out more about you and your books?

I’m currently working on a website and making my other social media accounts more active, but for right now the best way to follow me and my work is Facebook.

Author Interview with Simon Dillon

Dragon Soul Press sat down to interview Author Simon Dillon for his latest bone-chilling release, The Irresistible Summons. With the tagline of “How far would you go to bring the one you love back from the dead?” how could one resist the temptation? Especially when cutting-edge technology and evil meet.


How long on average does it take you to write a book?

I’d say it takes me about a year, on average, to write something like The Irresistible Summons or Spectre of Springwell Forest, if you include the initial inspiration, preparation and planning, writing the first draft, rewrites, edits, and so on.Irresistible Summons promo 8

Outside my usual psychological drama/supernatural thriller/horror spectrum, I’ve written some novels at record speed (my animal fiction adventure novel Echo and the White Howl, for instance), and others at a snail’s pace. I’ve got a fantasy epic I’ve been working at, on and off, for about twenty years. Still not sure if I’ll ever try and release it.

What was your hardest scene to write?

I can’t reveal that here, because it’s from a thriller/horror novel I’ve not yet published. Suffice to say, the scene in question was so disturbing and upsetting that I had to keep taking breaks every ten minutes to write that chapter. I’m made of pretty stern stuff, but that was fierce, even for me. It really had my stomach in knots.

From novels that are presently published, the finale of The Irresistible Summons was an absolute fiend to get right. Previous versions were either too gruesome, too repetitive, too bizarre, too long, or – incredible though it may seem – too optimistic.

What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

I’m going to cheat and pick three books – The Bartimaeus Sequence (comprising The Amulet of Samarkand, The Golem’s Eye, and Ptolemy’s Gate). This trilogy, set in a parallel London filled with powerful magicians, is particularly notable for witty first-person sections, told from the point of view of a highly intelligent and cunning demon summoned by the novel’s young protagonist. Highly recommended.

Or did you mean my own novels? Some of my children’s adventure novels are definitely under-appreciated, because they are just as much for adults as for children.

Do you want each book to stand on its own, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

Out of what I currently have published, with the notable exception of the George Hughes trilogy (my children’s science fiction novels), all my novels and short stories stand-alone. Even the George Hughes adventures are each stand-alone stories, though they should be read in order, as there are recurring characters and references to previous incidents.

Having said that, my horror/thriller novels do share a certain DNA and express variations on a theme. One reader I know jokes about “Simon Dillon Plot Bingo” (imperilled heroine, religious oppression, big central mystery, haunted locations, supernatural elements, cults and/or secret societies, melodramatic overdrive, big twist ending – apparently). I don’t see this as a bad thing. I think it means I’m getting known for a certain type of story. Just as long as I can keep surprising people within that format, I’m pleased to be stereotyped to a degree.

Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?

That’s a good question, because it follows on from what I said above. Actually, I think there is nothing wrong with following a formula and giving readers what they want. Agatha Christie did it. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle did it. JK Rowling did it (all the Harry Potter books follow a very clear formula, except the last one). But within these formulas, the above authors consistently surprised and delighted the reader.

Every writer wants to be original and put their own stamp on the world’s literature. However, that isn’t at the forefront of my mind when I write. Rather, I want to master the form in whatever genre I am working with. To that end, I try to give the reader what they want – but not the way they expect it. That’s the clue to any fine dramatic writing, in my opinion.

Of course, you can’t please everyone. The Irresistible Summons and Spectre of Springwell Forest both have fairly clear-cut conclusions, but one or two readers would have preferred more ambiguity. On the other hand, my next novel Phantom Audition (due out in October) is a much trickier beast. The various ways it can be interpreted may frustrate those who prefer clear-cut endings. As an author, you have to decide what you think is the correct, most satisfying ending, and stick with it. In fact, I always do. I don’t write any story until I know the ending and love it. Then I work backwards from that point.

Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

I’m not sure why I’ve been so foolhardy as to simply go by my real name, but I don’t really see what I gain by hiding behind a pseudonym. Privacy is the main reason cited, but if JK Rowling didn’t feel the need for one, I’m not sure I can be bothered either. I’d rather be loud and proud about what I put my name to.

What is your writing Kryptonite?

I often lurk on the event horizons of social media black holes and get sucked into vortices of very dark humour. Plus the internet in general is so distracting.

Does writing energize or exhaust you?

A bit of both really. But I can’t not write. It’s like breathing. If I don’t write at least a little each day, I feel like I’m wasting my life.

What is the first book that made you cry?

Watership Down, which I read at the age of nine, just before I read the second book that made me cry, The Lord of the Rings. I find it hard to imagine any intelligent, thoughtful reader coming away from either of those novels unaffected or unchanged. The final chapters of both had an incalculable effect on my young psyche, and the bittersweet truth that in this world at least, all things end.

Both books conclude with death, whether the literal death of Hazel, in Watership Down, or the figurative death of Frodo in The Lord of the Rings (not to mention the passing of the Elves, and the melancholy end of the magical eras of Middle Earth). However, although sad, neither scene is negative. It is simply the way of things, and, as Gandalf puts it, “not all tears are an evil”.

Where can readers learn more about you?

I’ve got a blog,which has regular updates on all my writing projects. It also features film reviews, links to my film podcast The Tangent Tree (which I co-host with Samantha Stephen), and other book/writing related articles. On top of that, I have a Facebook page.

Introducing Author Aditya Deshmukh

Dragon Soul Press presents creator of dark tales Author Aditya Deshmukh! Ranging from poetry, short stories, and novels, all contain elements of spine-tingling horror. Continue reading to see our interview with the author.


Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

Pseudonyms are useful when an author writes in a variety of genres. Yes, I’m a multi-genre author, but because the tone of almost all my stories fall under the same, wide umbrella of dark fiction, I never felt a need of a pseudonym. Psuedonyms are also used for hiding. I want to own everything I write. Putting pieces of my own soul under a fake name just doesn’t seem right to me. So unless I start writing something completely different than I’m used to (like children fiction or romance) and I don’t want that (delicate) audience going on a hunt to find my other (traumatic) stories, or unless I write something against powerful and corrupt entities which will put me on their radar, I have no plans to mask my identity.Aditya Deshmukh Website Logo

Do you think someone could be a writer if they don’t feel emotions strongly? 

I’m not a psychologist or a brain-scientist but I don’t think one needs to be an expert to understand that brain is a complex thing. And every person behaves differently when exposed to a certain situation. It’s a part of who we are, and every person is unique and so is their behaviour.

To answer this question, I’ll use myself as an example. I joke about being soulless (we dark fiction authors find it cool) but in truth I’m a sensitive person. I may not have a strong memory but I remember things. One never forgets the bad moments of one’s life. I believe crying helps. It’s kind of magical. The haunting memories surfaces, the pain erupts, you cry and you forget. That’s what I used to do. But my complex brain developed another layer of complexity. Now the bad things don’t quite affect me as strongly as they used to. It’s like there are walls around my heart filtering all the bad things. I willfully ignore them and it’s working pretty great.

I was a writer back then and I still am a writer.

It doesn’t matter how strongly you feel emotions. As long as you feel something (and you do because you’re a human), and you’re able to focus on that emotion, you can write that scene. In fact, even writers who feel emotions strongly sometimes struggle in writing that perfect scene. Writing is difficult. It’s a long process and there are no short-cuts. There are so many dimensions to it that frankly I think writing should be the most paying profession. It’s too much work and we’re expected to be good at everything. Don’t worry about any of your shortcomings. You can work on it and master it (and it’s going to be sooner than you think).

If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

Oh God, so many things! Because I just took my tea, I’m high on energy, so I’ll take the time to list them and elaborate on each point.

1) Just write it

This is perhaps the most popular writing advice ever. When I read it for the first time, I pictured a writer with black circles under their eyes staring at the blank screen, a pile books on writing on either side of the laptop and screaming, “Come on, just fucking write it!” There’s just so much advice available that it’s very easy to get distracted. We read so much about writing that we forget our topmost priority: writing. The worse thing is we actually feel satisfied after spending our hard-earned time (from work or college or family) on the articles and books and podcasts and YouTube channels and Twitter and Facebook and whatever. We feel happy about ourselves because we think we learned something new.

It’s just an illusion. Congratulations! You learned the same thing you read yesterday, or the earlier week, or the past month. I think if you read every day religiously for a month, most of the stuff you come across is a repetition. You still might learn something new. But is it worth your writing-time you spent on it?

That said, you should have some basic knowledge. Remember those 100,000 words of crap you wrote with zero writing wisdom which is so bad you cannot salvage anything? Yes, no one wants to read that shit. Spend a month in reading basic things. That will get you started.

 2) Discipline

Writing might have been your hobby. But now it’s a profession. Treat it like one. Set a routine and discipline yourself. Set small goals. Make them bigger as you progress. You must have a daily word count goal (it doesn’t have to be big. Mine is just 500 words). But you must strive to maintain the streak. Don’t think you can make it up on weekend. If you miss your daily goal, it will definitely kill your confidence.

3) Read

Once you’ve finished your word count goal, read books on writing. No, don’t roll your eyes. I’m not contradicting my earlier point. Read those books only if you’re sure it’s about something you don’t already know (and trust me there are many things you haven’t even heard. Don’t forget being a writer no longer means you just need to write. Today a writer is also a businessman. Learn about social media, marketing strategies, book distribution networks, how giants like Amazon work). Why not just skip “Just write it” and learn all this stuff first? That’s one way to do things, but then expect to spend at least a decade. As I said, these things take a lot of time. And the most effective way to learn is to learn in steps. It’s fortunately also the most fun way.

Articles are good, but I encourage getting a book (don’t just randomly pick any book. Go through lists of recommendations, compare them, see if they provide exactly what you need and only then start reading. This will save not only your money but also time.) You can then treat it like a subject and study every single element with dedication. Good articles are hard to find, and most of the stuff is repeated. When you finish a book, you’ll have more solid knowledge on that subject.

4) Have fun #1

Don’t expect your writing to get better just by reading about writing. Yes, it will certainly develop. You will not hesitate from calling yourself a good writer. But good is not enough. You want to be the best. You want to become a champion. And for that you need to read other champions’ books.

Read a lot and read widely. I cannot stress enough how exponentially your knowledge boosts up when you make this a regular habit. You get exposed to new writing styles, better dialogue, action, plots, fighting scenes, descriptions, pace, character development, you understand every little thing there is to writing just by conscious reading. Ask questions like why the writer didn’t write it this way? Why is it that the writer decided this ending when other endings are possible? Why did the writer trade good dialogue for what could have been an epic fight scene? Why these characters feel like real people? Why do I love this story so much? Yeah, analyze everything about your favourites. Go crazy!

5) Have fun #2!

There’s another way to have fun and sharpen your writing skills simultaneously: watching movies and TV shows. Yeah, don’t blink, don’t reread that sentence. I mean it. I don’t understand why it isn’t a very commonly heard advice. It has worked like magic for me. I’m a terribly slow reader. If I cannot finish a book in reasonable time, how can I learn from it? And on the contrary, I’m a binge watcher. I can devour an entire season in a night. Most of my understanding of fiction came from the shows I studied. All those questions I listed in the above paragraph can be applied here also. Remember that literature, films, all these are just different mediums of the same thing we want to tell: stories. As long as you actively observe and study, you can derive knowledge applicable to your writing from any source.

6) Build a platform

Internet is crazy. Make use of it. I’m an introvert and if you ask me to give a speech I’ll melt before your eyes. And yet here I’m, still talking something that (hopefully) makes sense. If you can socialize in real life, that’s great! But internet helps you reach audience who perhaps haven’t even heard about your town. Isn’t that great? Just imagine how wider your reach is now. What’s that smell? Something is burning. Must be our jealous writer-ancestors. 

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

Research is a very important step in the writing process. It plays a big role in making stuff sound realistic. I do most of the research during outlining. I add comments to the document explaining the research elements and include links to the websites from where I got the information for future reference. I note down things which are yet to be researched.

I understand the importance of research, but I do not give it priority in case I’m writing a short story on a short deadline and lots of stuff is remaining. But I do make it a point to ensure that my guesses are reasonable. If you’re short on time, you can still create a realistic environment provided you haven’t included stuff that your audience know is 100% false. If you have time, don’t be lazy. Research matters. Now information is available easily and it’s everywhere. Books are still the best resource, but there are tons of blogs and vlogs and YouTube channels you can explore. Don’t forget to compare facts. If you can compare with standard sources, that’s good. Otherwise simply go with the widely accepted idea (facts many sources state in similar manner opposed to something only one source claims is the truth)

For my longer works, I spend months on research. My dystopian novella “Black Veins” is coming out this September, and for it I had to read about philosophies on society and recent development in robotics. Yeah, it’s going to be fun!

What is the most difficult part of your artistic process?

 I don’t suppose I can name one thing. Either they all are equally easy or equally difficult.

But yeah, diffidence is definitely something that bothers me. And I’m sure many writers face this problem. I stress a lot on quality. To the eyes of others the stuff I write is good, but I think it could be better. I know nothing can ever be perfect. But this knowledge is not enough. It’s kind of like a staircase with no end. You can climb it, every stair making your story more beautiful. But you have to stop somewhere and it’s hard to decide when. Fortunately my mind is not always bleak. The confidence returns. I just say fuck it and type ‘END.’

How long on average does it take you to write a book?

Depends on the book. Few months back I finished a book in just two months. My very first attempt at novel-writing is four years old and nowhere near completion. As I said I focus on quality, not speed. If I write faster, I can see my quality deteriorating. So the wait doesn’t bother me much.

What’s the best way to market your books?

 I may not be the best person to answer this question. But I know that there is no universal best way. What works for someone may not work for you. The best thing to do is to attempt everything (social media, ads, mailing list, book tours), analyze the data, and then create your own strategy.

Do you want each book to stand on its own, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

Oh no I can’t answer that question. Oops, by saying that I’ve already answered, haven’t I?

Yeah, each book stands on its own unless its a part of a well-defined series, but there’s definitely a common element regardless of the genres. It’s very subtle. And it’s going to be super fun when it becomes obvious. So let’s not ruin it now.

Where can readers learn more about you?

My Facebook page is pretty active. Do subscribe to my Newsletter and join my Facebook group. It’s a fun place. And yes, you’ll get free stories! DSP has added an author page to their website. Also check out my website. You’ll find free stories and poems from not just me, but also other talented writers I invite every week for a chat. Feel free to message me. I’m always finding new ways to procrastinate and will chat on almost anything.

Introducing Author Lydia Anne Stevens

Dragon Soul Press proudly announces Author Lydia Anne Stevens and her Hell Fire Series featuring six books! The first, Highway to Hell, releases August 19th! Enjoy our interview with this author below.


When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?

There has always been a part of me that has known I want to be a writer. Ever since I was a little girl, being drawn into Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House Series, I envisioned myself being Laura herself, living a life and becoming so immersed in the story that it had to be written and shared. The passion continued for story telling with the American Girl stories. Perhaps it was the quintessential idea of being an American and chasing a dream but it drove me to enter and win contests such as the Daughters of the American Revolution Essay and I used classics such as, Nathanial Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown”, Paulo Coelho’s, The Alchemist, and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to pen essays and papers which have since been used by professors as exemplars for outstanding academia.

As far as creative writing, I have always developed stories. I even have a note that I wrote to my parents telling them I was running away when I was ten. I wrote them the whole story of where I was going, what I was taking, and what I was going to do when I got there. To this day it still makes me chuckle. I even told them I was going to take the dog with me and how I planned on feeding him. I have boxes of papers and notebooks with stories I wrote which may never see the light of day again, but I’ve always been a writer from the time I could pick up a pen.

The passion for novels and writing has continued into adulthood through reading more classics like, Little Women by Louisa May Alcott and Dracula by Bram Stoker. It morphed into a love of “forbidden” romances when I was a teenager and then I discovered J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. Ever since I fell into the fantasy genre I can’t get enough of reading and writing it. My favorites are now urban fantasy with or without subgenres such as, Karen Marie Moning, Kevin Hearne, Darynda Jones, Patricia Briggs, Ilona Andrews, Diana Gabaldon, Deborah Harkness, Rick Riordan, J. R. Ward and of course, J. K. Rowling. I will write almost any genre in my freelance writing including horror, romance, commercial fiction, erotica, mystery, science fiction and suspense.

How long does it take you to write a book?

It takes me about three months to write a book. I do have to say that writing is what I do all day every day. I have a Masters Degree in Creative Writing and am pursuing a PhD in Creative Writing so I feel that to be clear, everyone has a different writing speed. For a client I can do a full-length novel in two weeks and average between 10,000 to 15,000 words per day; therefore, I can have a 75,000 word novel done in that time. However, there are different factors to this. Sometimes I am presented a plot by a client and sometimes I have to come up with my own based on a theme or genre for them so in some ways, the brainstorming has already been done.

With my own work, there is a lot of research that goes into the themes, mythology, religion, cultural facets etc. I am a panster with my own work so when I sit down to write, I have the story premise and then I just write, looking up the information I need about the aforementioned techniques and machinations of the process as I go. I am the writer who has notebooks, pens, sticky notes, napkins and receipts for whenever inspiration hits with my own work because I never know when the characters will start talking. So, for my own work I say three months to incorporate all of the things that have been conceptualized, brainstormed, inspired etc. and that is about one month of all of that, one month of sitting down and just writing and pulling in all of those bits and pieces and then another month for revising, editing, and re-writing to a draft that I feel is appropriate to hand off to an editor or beta reader. There is an additional editing process of course, which could take several more months depending on the editor or publisher, but for my own self disciplines I say three months.

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

I have compartments in my brain for my story ideas. They are in neat boxes all lined up almost like a factory, and I can see it in my head. Depending on what work I want to focus on, I take the lid of that particular “Pandora’s Box” and let the inspiration and ideas fly. When I need to focus on a client’s work I put the lid on the box and ignore the rattling for an hour or two before I can open another box. I am very visual so being able to see where the twenty-six current story ideas are being stored is useful to me. Occasionally I have a character who rattles the chains on the box and breaks out, going through a stroll in my subconscious until my conscious self acknowledges him or her and then that is why whatever being resides in the seat of power gifted us puny humans with coffee. Those sessions with characters are often interesting depending on what they have to tell me and at what God-awful hour of the night they might decide to tell it. Those are also my favorite characters who refuse to follow my carefully crafted rules which are put in place to protect my sanity. But then again, any writer who claims to be sane is either in denial and needs more of the blessed caffeinated stuff, or they are lying. I also have two hats I wear when I write. One is a black top hat from England which belongs to my brother. The other is a straw hat I recently won which is embroidered with the phrase, “do not disturb.” My close friends who know my writing quirks remind me it’s too late for that, but the hats help contain the chaos within, so it flows through my fingers and onto the page. One hat is just for more formal writing than the other.

Where do you get your information or ideas for your books?

Life is my inspiration. I know this is the party line but it’s true. The people I meet, connect with, and interact with are inspiration. But it is more than that. I can look at a back lawn, sunflower littered with grass that most people would complain is too long and needs to be cut and yet I see the tiny village of fairy people whose homes are being threatened by the humans. The story starts to roll in my head and all of a sudden, I have Pixie, the fairy, who rides a bumble bee and they endeavor to save their home and the bees who have become endangered.

The point of that is, I see life as still being full of magic where others might see it as a lawn that needs to be mowed. Magic may not be classically defined anymore such as with Tolkien’s ideals of magic with wizards, orcs and flaming eyeballs, but fantasy isn’t just a genre to escape reality. It takes the harshness of reality and provides a place for a reader to cope with their own circumstances and realities. The magic is in the effect that humans have left on society either from the past or present and the essence of what humanity is. I see the magic in the places they have been and the things that they do and influence. In a world where technology allows us to see all of the bad things that happen, I chose to focus on the wonder of how humans en mass, are still beautiful and magical either together or as individuals. This inspires me and is where my ideas come from. Magic for me is still very real but more importantly, it is something worth writing about.

What do you think makes a good story?

A good story is something that can make a reader take a part of it into their life and either learn something from it, or use it to cope with their own life and any difficulties they may face or help them recognize the importance of the blessings they may have. How a writer tells a story doesn’t necessarily make it good or bad, that is just technique and technique is something any writer should constantly be working to improve. A good story is the idea that it is going to reach a reader, even if it is just one reader, and be profound enough to impact them in a positive manner. These are the kinds of stories that make a reader hurt, love, cry, laugh, rejoice, anger, and celebrate with the characters. They are the stories that even if it forces a reader to take a good hard look at their life and count the blessings of what they have or make them uncomfortable in the fact that they inspire that reader to change-they still make the reader think or say, “well, damn.” This is either good or bad, but the effect is the same. It brought the reader to a place that makes them actively engage with the story and apply themselves to the circumstances of the characters or the circumstances of the story to the reality of their own life.

What is your writing Kryptonite?

Sound and attitudes are my Kryptonite. I can write with sound but prefer complete silence. It is difficult with an eight-year-old, but I write better at two in the morning when the only sound is the characters in my head. The worst, however, is people’s attitudes. Writers are underappreciated. It isn’t a “real” vocation because people tend to appreciate the humanities when it is someone famous or historical, but most writers and artists aren’t appreciated because family, friends, and fans, might not understand the process. They want to appreciate the completed work, but don’t understand that it takes hours of hard work which isn’t just sitting at a desk and suddenly words appear on the screen.

I’ve heard more than once that my job is sitting at a desk and that there is no manual labor, therefore it can’t possibly be real work. I disagree. Mental work is in some ways more grueling than manual labor, but without getting into all that is PC and right with the world, the fact remains that ignorance is often the culprit of malcontent. If one doesn’t understand what writers do, it is difficult to appreciate the contributions it makes to society and culture, and therefore breeds poor attitudes in general. People want the instant gratification. To be able to click a link and read some text is all they care about. Think about how much people read on a day to day basis for even menial tasks like traffic signs, work emails, social media posts, articles etc. Then think about creative writing and how much effort that takes. People want the words and they are integral to everyday life, even creative works which may be an escape from life, but they don’t care how they get there.

I find myself very depressed when I am told my writing isn’t real work or how this is a dream and not worthy of a real vocation. I remind them it isn’t a dream anymore since it is what I do on a day to day basis, but there is the misconception that real means lucrative success such as a New York Times Bestseller. Even then the moment might be fleeting, and I never became a writer for the money. However, people’s attitudes effect my writing if it is persistent or really negative. I have to carefully assess whether that person is beneficial to my life and what I want from my writing career, and then move on. As a human, I still feel the emotional highs and lows, so when someone attacks my high points in life, it can be my Kryptonite and I might not write for a few days. The beauty of superheroes, however, even writer superheroes is that we always get back up, dust the pen and cape off, and carry on with our badass selves.

If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

Hahaha! Actually, don’t quit. Don’t you ever quit. You will want to. You will think about it, but don’t ever give it up. Everyone on this planet has a gift to give, whether the gift is good or bad and has a positive or negative impact on the fellow man, but writing is your gift and you gave up for a short spell and it was the worst time of your life. You forgot yourself and your gift, but don’t you dare ever give up again. You will be told you can’t do it. You will be told to get a real job like everyone else and it will hurt like Hell. But it is going to hurt a lot worse if you quit. There is a dark place in your soul where the creature who doesn’t write and appreciate your gift lives. Don’t ever let that creature take over again. Everyone has their demons they have to live with. You have two choices, learn to live with the demon or tell it to get stepping because you have things to accomplish in this life and with this gift. Besides, if you think about it, it isn’t your demon anyway. It is the preconceived judgements of others that moved in, took over for a spell, and then festered. Don’t you ever give up on yourself and your gift again. Ever.

What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

I do read a lot of bestsellers so this one is a bit hard. I love Frewin Jones’ The Faerie Path Series. I typically read adult with a few YA ventures but there is something youthful and hopeful about this series that touches me. I think writers always retain a sense of youthful vitality. To be a writer one has to have a vivacious outlook on life, but this series really embodies the idea of fantasy representing the idea of hope within youth. Frewin Jones, a pen name for Allen Frewin Jones is a British writer who is 65 and has over 90 children’s, YA and fantasy novels. However, because he is a foreign writer, I’m not sure how well he is appreciated in America? If I were to choose an American writer, I would go with Stephen King’s memoir, On Writing. Being a native Mainer, it is nice to see the success one man from a small town can achieve. I think because he is the Horror King, his memoir is underappreciated, but I recommend it to any writer, aspiring or established because of how earthy and genuine his novel about his writing career has been.

What is the most difficult part of your artistic process?

Commas! I’m getting a little better, but generally the words come so hard and fast that I just don’t consider punctuation until it is time to revise. Then I am so focused on the characters, setting, plot etc. that I just don’t see them. Revising aside because I think every writer has something they can improve on; I find the most difficult part of my artistic process to be prioritizing the writing. Sometimes I desperately want to write on one of my novels, but I know I have the piece due for a client or an essay for school etc. I am finding more time for my own work now that my Masters Degree is completed. The PhD will be focused solely on a creative piece I want to work on, but my focus is now evenly split between clients and my own work, without the academic essays to include in that as well. The only other detriment is when I have a list of priorities which seem to all be at the top and then nothing gets done because I’m so frazzled, I forget to have coffee. Then I have a day assessing my life choices. The day one forgets coffee is the day they take off from work, writing, peopling and all other sorts of activities.

Where can readers learn more about you?

I’m everywhere! A good place to start is Amazon, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Goodreads, Tumblr, and LinkedIn.

 

Rowan Thalia Announces 2nd Series

Up and coming Reverse Harem Author Rowan Thalia has completed her first paranormal trilogy, Keepers of the Talisman! After her rapid releases full of witches, Fae, and mayhem, the romance author has more in store for her avid readers.

Introducing a new apocalyptic trilogy centered around a female soldier. Life is far from easy after the BioWar (World War III), wiping out most of the populace and mutating nearly everything left. Enjoy the first official book summary below.

 

BioWar, World War III
Sixty years ago, the first shot was fired.
  
In the last ten years, our country has fallen. Chemical agents dropped mercilessly on friend and foe alike have created two new species of humanoid, and the world population has been reduced to small colonies of humans fighting against them to survive.
 
Out on a routine patrol, my team and I run into the worst kind of trouble. Branded and left for dead by our superiors, we form bonds that cannot be broken and find asylum with the enemy.
 
Seeking knowledge, my sexy team of four and I race across the wasteland fighting zombies, mutants, and our own transformation for the one thing that can give us answers: a sample of untainted DNA. Aligned with vampires and on the run, we thought things couldn’t get worse until a hidden threat finds me.
 
When conspiracy is the norm, who can I trust?
 
The war is not over and the fight between the species has just begun.

 

The first of this trilogy, Rox’s Renegades, will be releasing May 20th, 2019. However, the preorder is available now for those wanting to take advantage of the limited time offer of $0.99. Once preorder ends, the price will raise to the regular $3.99.

Thankfully due to Rowan’s impressive writing speed, you will not be waiting long for the two sequels. Renegades at War and Renegades in Space will be releasing in June and July. To keep up with the author, follow her on Facebook and visit her website.

books2read.com/Roxs-Renegades