Author Interview with Laura Q. Jimenez

Dragon Soul Press had an opportunity to sit down to interview Author Laura Q. Jimenez. She is featured in DSP’s Imperial Devices.


  1. Have you always wanted to be a writer?

I’m not sure at what point I seriously started to think about being a writer. As a kid, my favorite thing in the world was to get lost in daydreams. I’d disappear into my own head, sometimes for days at a time, and only re-emerge when that particular adventure ran its course. At some point in my pre-teen years, I worried that I would forget the wild and wondrous tales I dreamt up, so I started writing them down and never stopped. It probably wasn’t until a few years later, in high school, that the idea of being someone who writes professionally occurred to me.

  1. What comes first, the plot or characters?

Character. Always character. I start from a point of someone interesting. Either someone who is visually striking, or has a fascinating personality, or a memorable background. Then I explore. Who are they? What do they do? When faced with a nail-biting problem, how do they react? Figuring out how the problem actually plays out or is solved, i.e. the plot, comes much later in the process.

  1. How many plot ideas are just waiting to be written? Can you tell us about one?

So, so many. Someone much smarter than me once said that ideas are like grains of sand at the beach. You can’t help stepping on them, and they get everywhere, in your hair, in your teeth. The challenge is figuring out which ones are good or interesting enough to be worth writing about.

The book I am currently working on is an urban fantasy that centers on a young woman who is slowly cracking like a porcelain doll but instead of blood, the split skin reveals solid gold underneath. All she knows is that she’s experiencing a sudden thirst for violence, that a smiling demon keeps crossing her path, and that she might be falling in love with the girl next door. Now she has to race against time to figure out what is happening to her and how to stop it before she crumbles into so many shiny shards.

  1. Who is the author you most admire in your genre?

That is a tough choice. There are so many extremely talented authors writing in science fiction and fantasy. At the very top of the list stands Neil Gaiman, arm in arm with Terry Pratchett. Good Omens was the first title I ever read with either of their names on it. I now have a signed copy on a special place on my shelf, dog-eared and water-logged, but still my favorite.

Gaiman creates brilliant worlds that evoke a very particular time in life but are simultaneously timeless. Meanwhile, Pratchett saw the real world and painted over it with a satirical brush, creating hilarious social commentary that was scathing in its intensity.

Other amazing individuals who have shaped my reading and writing more recently, and that I absolutely can’t not mention, include V.E. Schwab, N.K. Jemisin, and Tamsyn Muir. Octavia Butler. Alix E. Harrow. I better stop before this turns into a five-thousand word manifesto. Chuck Wendig. Delilah Dawson. Okay, okay, I’ll stop.

  1. What are you reading now?

I am one of those people who has at least three or four books in the works at a time, switching between them depending on my mood.

Thus, I am currently reading Once Upon a River, by Diane Setterfield, about a little inn by the Thames River, where a young girl drowned and was declared dead. Until she wasn’t.

I am getting ready to dive into The Harpy 2: Evolution, the second book in the Harpy series by Julie Hutchings, about Charity Blake, a young woman who turns into a vicious winged monster to wreak vengeance on those who would harm others as she was harmed in the past.

I have also just finished reading N.K. Jemison’s Broken Earth trilogy, a series about a planet angry with its human parasites, punishing them with cruel seasons and endless earthquakes; shakes that can only be stopped by those with special orogenic powers: people who are simultaneously revered for their usefulness, and reviled for the danger they pose.

  1. What do you like to do when you are not writing?

When I am not busy with my day job, writing my books, or reading the work of others, I am probably playing video games with my son (we’ve played just about every Lego title out there), or Dungeons & Dragons with my friends. There are so many ways to play games with people virtually these days, and we’ve been taking full advantage!

  1. What are the key challenges you face when writing a book?

In any project, the biggest challenge for me is probably The End. Beginnings are fun and easy, like a new relationship. Actually, it very much is a relationship. It most often feels like I’m trying to woo the story into existence. At the outset, everything is exciting, butterflies in our bellies, just getting to know one another. Even the middle isn’t too terrible. We’ve had some spats, we’re learning to navigate the other’s emotional baggage, making compromises. But the end is always a struggle. All the loose ends must be tied up, the emotional delivery has to resonate, the breakup has to be clean. In short, even if the reader isn’t happy, they have to feel closure.

It’s one thing I cannot say I’ve completely mastered, but as with all things, we keep working at it, and get better every time!

  1. Share something your readers wouldn’t know about you.

Most people don’t know that I studied anatomy on cadavers as an undergrad. I’m an exercise physiologist by trade so I have to be intimately familiar with every bone, muscle, and joint in the human body. That meant spending a semester visiting the medical campus once a week, getting elbow-deep into one dead body or another, and frequently leaving past sundown, still covered in bits and juices, and smelling like your tenth grade Biology lab. Ah, the good old days.

  1. If you had to describe yourself in three words, what would they be?

Academic Forest Goblin.

I should probably explain what that means, but I think it’s more fun if I don’t. Whatever you’re imagining is probably close enough.

10. Where can readers learn more about you?

Website, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Amazon.

Author Interview with Benjamin Chandler

Dragon Soul Press had an opportunity to sit down and interview Author Benjamin Chandler. He is featured in DSP’s Imperial Devices anthology.


  1. What inspired you to begin writing?

I enjoyed making up stories as a kid, either playing with toys or drawing comics, but I never considered becoming a writer. It wasn’t until I was an adult in grad school, getting my MFA in book and paper arts, that I took a couple creative writing classes and realized I how much I enjoyed playing with words.

2. What, in your opinion, are the most important elements of good writing?

As a reader, I like good prose—unique word choices, novel metaphors and similes, style, that pretty, creative stuff. I like sentences so delicious I want to reread and then eat them.

3. How do you come up with the titles to your books?

I struggle with that. I wish “Untitled” was as acceptable a title in the writing world as it is in the visual arts world. I often try to make my stories’ titles as simple and brief as possible—just the barest bridge to lead the reader into the text—though that doesn’t always happen. Sometimes my titles sprawl like jetsam across a beach.

4. What is the most difficult part about writing for you?

Aside from thinking of a title? Probably daring to share it with the world. There certainly is pleasure in crafting a good story, but after writing “The End” an internal voice speaks up, wanting connection, validation. It’s heartening to learn someone else in the world appreciates and connects with my work, but it’s scary to put the work out there and hope for that connection to happen. The Specter of Possible Rejection is a hard shadow for me to peek from and wave my work around for others to see.

5. How much ‘world building’ takes place before you start writing?

Little. For me, it happens as I write. Histories or the rules of the world develop in my head as the story moves along. Eventually, though, a passage needs a certain detail and I start drawing maps or making lists to fill out the world beyond those big ideas. I have a big, fat notebook full of fictional month titles, mountain names, monster doodles, character sketches, vocabularies, diagrams, sub-plots, and maps that I end up referencing to as the story’s world expands chapter by chapter. I can’t keep it all in my head; I forget.

6. How many plot ideas are just waiting to be written? Can you tell us about one?

I have about a half-dozen ideas currently knocking around my head, though I’d be surprised if even half of those reach the “start typing” phase. I’d love to flesh out one idea I have, but it might be too ambitious (which is a polite way of saying, “It’s a mess”). It’s about Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins, the man who constructed prehistoric animal sculptures for the Crystal Place exposition in the 1850s. The sculptures are hollow, so the story’s hook is that one morning Hawkins goes to his studio and finds a dead body inside one of his unfinished dinosaurs. The Body In The Iguanodon (working title). Then Hawkins helps solve the murder. I thought up other ideas that could play in the book—contemporary paleontologist Richard Owen haunted by the ghosts of extinct animals; a man who is able to pull images of the past with some kind of spiritualist camera; Hawkins trying to balance his two families (he was a bigamist); the fact that Hawkins and I share the same first name adds a nice meta layer—but it all just sits in my head, a murder mystery/weird tales/meta/paleofiction octopus of ideas. It’ll probably never see the light of day.

7. Who is your favorite author and why?

The answer to this question changes with my mood. Some days it’s Thomas Pynchon, some days Ursula Le Guin, other days Salman Rushdie or Umberto Eco. Today I’ll say it’s Marilynne Robinson. Her characters are so real, their emotions so true, her prose so careful—I read her novels in wonder.

8. What are you reading now?

I am reading an older novel about a centurion in love with Pontius Pilate’s wife called Hear Me, Pilate! I downloaded it from gutenberg.org on a total whim and am enjoying it way more than I thought I would. I’m only a handful of chapters in, but I find the book veers close to pulp in its tone at times. It’s a lot saucier than I anticipated—lots of feisty women in clinging, sheer robes and the oily, muscular men who love them against the backdrop of ancient, dusty cities. When the occasional theological elements arrive, they seem out of place next to sultry ancients. I’m curious how the novel plays out, (I mean, I have a good idea about where it’s going…. “What is truth?”, &c.) but I’m not deep enough into it to be able to recommend it or not.

9. What do you like to do when you are not writing?

I love to cook and eat almost any cuisine. Living in a small city in Slovakia, I can’t find the Thai, Mexican, and Indian restaurants I used to frequent in Chicago, so I’ve had to learn to make curries and the like from scratch, improvising with available ingredients. (There is a fantastic Vietnamese restaurant in town, though.) I also like to draw with my oldest son, play Godzilla with my youngest son, watch cooking shows and comedies with my wife, and make cocktails for myself. During non-pandemic times I enjoy bowling and playing disk golf.

10. Where can readers learn more about you?

I tweet: @blchandler9000 and I have a semi-retired tumblr of paleofiction at antediluvianechoes.tumblr.com

Writing Resources

As writers, we often find ourselves needing a little bit of help to navigate the task that is crafting a story. But sometimes, we don’t always know where to turn when we need a little bit of a creative boost. It is usually in those times of need that we turn to the internet for some inspiration. And below, I have put together a list of my favorite online sources for when I need a little nudge. 

Writing resources:

Fantasy Names Generator

Have you ever found yourself completely stuck as to what name you should give a character, or what to call a new piece of technology in your world? I’ve been there a few times and that is how I discovered Fantasy Names Generator. If you haven’t already discovered this website, then you really need to go check it out. It has literally a category for everything from troll names to steampunk city names to actual human names from the 20th century – chances are this website will inspire you if you’re ever stuck for a name. It’s also got a generator for character descriptions or story prompts so if you’re experiencing writer’s block a browse usually helps to give the creative wheels a turn in the right direction. 

Artbreeder

I love creating visual representations for my characters. There is something about seeing them come to life that makes their story that much more tangible for me. Unfortunately, I did not inherit my mother’s fine art skills. Instead, my repertoire for “fine art” is limited to questionably symmetrical star doodles and lopsided stick figures. And turning my characters into stick figures isn’t exactly inspiring. Thankfully, that is where Artbreeder comes in. It’s a free website where you can create characters. And it’s so much fun! Another app that I like to use on my phone is Dollify since it gives you more of a cutesy/anime look to your characters. 

Pinterest

Okay, I will admit, this one is pretty obvious. Most of you probably already use Pinterest for creating mood boards. But I thought I’d include it just incase. I cannot state enough how much I love mood boards. And Pinterest is my favorite place to search for and create mood boards. Not only have I found mood boards to be a great way of plotting out scenes or reinvigorating myself with creative energy when I hit a writer’s block, but sharing them with your followers on social media is also a great way to drum up interest in your work. 

Grammarly

Yes, regular spell check on your computer is great. But if you want that little bit extra, Grammarly is excellent. It will catch things that the regular spell check on Microsoft Word might not. And if you are choosing to do some self-editing of your manuscript, I highly recommend getting Grammarly, it’s worth the money.

Facebook Groups

If you’re stuck looking for like-minded people, look no further than Facebook. Especially in today’s current climate with the COVID-19 pandemic it’s not like we can just go out and attend writing workshops and stuff in order to meet fellow writers. So, going online and finding a Facebook group is a great way of still being able to get the benefit of having a writing circle but also remaining socially distant. And even during non-apocalyptic times, online Facebook groups can still be a great way to connect with other writers in your area or from around the world. I am personally a member of several, my two favorite ones being the Fantasy and Scifi Writers and the NaNoWriMo group. The F/SF one is great for obvious reasons, since it’s right within the two genres I tend to write and read the most, the members really understand the struggles of being a F/SF writer. And the NaNoWriMo one is another great resource as there are writers of all genres in that one. And it gets particularly busy around November, so it’s a wonderful support system to have if you ever participate in the NaNoWriMo challenge because it’s literally thousands of other writers going through the exact same struggle as you trying to finish 50k in 30 days. 

What are some of your favorite writing resources? Let me know!

Author Interview with Isabella Cheung

Dragon Soul Press sat down with Author Isabella Cheung for an interview. She is a featured author in DSP’s Lost Love anthology.

  1. When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I don’t think I really considered myself a ‘writer’ until I reached eleventh grade in high school. I’ve been writing for fun ever since I was a child, but I never really thought of it as something I could succeed in until I started doing it more. I was more-so into the fine arts (to specify, drawing) up until that year, when I took a Creative Writing course. Being in that class somewhat introduced me to writing for myself, rather than in a strictly academic fashion.

  1. What is the most difficult part about writing for you?

My writing/creative process tends to come in little bursts, which makes it difficult to bang out an entire story all in one day. For me, good ideas tend to come late at night (a decent amount past midnight!), so I’m consistently stuck trying to decide whether to get a good night’s sleep or write! (It’s usually the latter).

  1. How do you come up with the titles to your books?

I usually don’t come up with a title until I’ve finished writing the story in its entirety, and even then, it can be somewhat difficult for me. I tend to try and pick-out words or phrases that catch my eye throughout the story.

  1. Who is your favorite character?

In the stories that I’ve written, my favorite character would probably be Irina, a fallen angel from my most recent story, An Angel’s Desire. From other series that I’ve read, my all-time favourite character would be Will Herondale from Cassandra Clare’s The Infernal Devices.

  1. Are you working on anything at the present you would like to share with your readers about?

While I haven’t made much progress on it recently, having to balance different workloads, I am in the process of drafting my first novel, which will hopefully be part of a four-book series in the future.

  1. On a typical day, how much time do you spend writing?

Being an English Major, I tend to do a fair bit of academic writing throughout a typical day. I try to fit in at least fifteen minutes of writing in my free-time, whether that be planning for an upcoming project, or even a bit of drafting. Recently, I’ve had a bit of time off, so I have been writing a lot for my current WIP.

  1. Who is your favorite author and why?

I don’t think I could narrow it down to one author in particular, but a few whose works I tend to enjoy are: Cassandra Clare, Rick Riordan, Sarah J Maas, and Leigh Bardugo. Reading their stories is like stepping into an entirely different world and having the adventure of a lifetime. I think it’s cool to be able to read their books and think about the amount of planning and creativity it takes to invent these mystical worlds, and then apply it to my own writing.

  1. What do you like to do when you are not writing?

Funnily enough, when I’m not writing I tend to be ingesting hockey in any sort of way (reading articles, scrolling through game highlights, etc.). I’m a huge fan of my hometown team, the Vancouver Canucks, and find the sport fascinating to watch. Playing it, on the other hand… it’s safe to say that I probably shouldn’t be put in skates too often!

  1. What are you reading now?

One of my friends recently managed to get me started on Sarah J Maas’s Throne Of Glass series, so I’m currently burning my way through those books. I’ve also recently read Stalking Jack the Ripper, by Kerri Maniscalco, and These Violent Delights, by Chloe Gong, both of which are great books for those who are big fans of mystery and historical fiction, like myself.

  1. Where can readers learn more about you?

I’m currently in the process of setting up a website for myself, but I’m available on Facebook, Instagram, and Linktree.