Author Interview with Kortney Gallagher

Dragon Soul Press sat down to interview Author Kortney Gallagher after her appearance in the Lethal Impact anthology.


1. What inspired you to start writing?

I don’t like to think it was one single thing that inspired me to start writing. The plot to my favorite books excited me, the death of a fantastic character awed me, my children’s support pushes me, and the desire just to write for fun keeps me going, inspiring me to write every day. Which one began it? I couldn’t say.

2. What comes first, the plot or characters?

The characters, I sit and make a list of characters, I usually begin with five to ten, all intertwining, and one unrelated oddball, who is maybe a bit eccentric. I give those characters meaning, emotions, family ties, and personalities, then I decide what kind of chaos I am going to send them through in the next book plot.

3. What is the most difficult part about writing for you?

The most difficult part about writing for me is probably finding the time to write; between family, friends, work and outside obligations, sometimes I have to force myself to sit down and write for ten to fifteen minutes. I used to carry around a small journal that I started my first ever plot idea in, but I had more time to write by hand than to type, and got terribly behind.

4. What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?

I get all of my writing ideas straight from my very own dreams, sometimes I wake up at super odd hours and make myself random voice notes, just to wake up the next day and realize they make no sense at all.

5. What does success mean to you? What is the definition of success?

Dictionary.com says the definition of success is “The accomplishment of an aim or purpose.”

My purpose is to write; if I can write forever, even if I am the only one that reads it, I am successful.

6. Where do you get your inspiration?

Since a lot of my ideas do come to me in dreams, I imagine my inspirations come from my everyday life; a silly thing one of my daycare children say or do, a smart remark from one of my teens, a movie or show I binge-watched before bed. Possibly even way too much sugar before sleep.

7. Who is your favorite author and why?

If Cassandra Clare and Stephanie Meyers made a book baby together, I would be in heaven. I enjoy both of their writing styles so much and always look forward to new releases from them.

8. What do you like to do when you are not writing?

I run a full-time in-home daycare, raise my four children who are 5, 10, 13 and 14, cook, clean, play with my cats or dog, binge read new books and sometimes I have a cup of coffee and stare out the window for no reason what-so-ever, to help my brain relax.

9. Who is your hero?

I have three heroes, people I can only hope to be someday. Michael Bixby, my fifth-grade teacher, although I am an adult, I still remember the fifth grade, how hard and confusing it was. Mr.Bixby not only helped me through it, but encouraged me to move above and beyond it, pushing me to be the very best me I can be, and still to this day I try to live up to that standard. My father, who worked hard my entire childhood to raise me to be the person I am today and my mother, who struggled with addiction her entire life, and is over a year clean and sober today, showing me it’s never too late to change your life forever.

10. Where can readers learn more about you?

Facebook is my favorite social media app. https://www.facebook.com/kortney.gallagher.56/

Instagram is also great, Instagram.com/author_Kortneyg

Nip the Naysayers

It is hard enough being a writer, sending your writing out only to receive rejection letters. But what about those around you who are critical of your passion for a career that pays little, but calls to your soul? I get criticism too. Often people tell me they see it as a hobby. It is not a hobby to me. It is my life. They don’t see it that way no matter what I tell them. I want to share some tips on how to ignore them, keep writing, and maintain your sanity.

A rejection letter is harsh. When your aunt or employment counselor chides you for not becoming a lawyer or an executive, it’s even harder. They make you grind your teeth at night and develop headaches because you feel like quitting writing just so they would be quiet. Well, take heart.

Writing, like the arts, doesn’t get much love from those who don’t see it the way we would like them too. From their perspective, it’s a dalliance, a hobby–or worse–a waste of time. To those of us who are serious, getting published in magazines or books is life or death. We love seeing our byline in a publication and are bit by the itch to get the next byline or the next publishing contract. We perfect our query letters and synopses to the best of our ability.

If you do sense you are under attack, perhaps telling people you are busy writing and closing the door to your writing studio will do the trick. Be assertive, but not overly upset and they should get the hint. We can’t change them. It is a sad fact of life, but we can change the way we respond to them. It’s not fair, but life is not fair.

Another great way to get naysayers off your back? I can think of two. One, you put honest effort in… and you are, right? Two, they see you succeeding at it. Then they will look forward to seeing your next published book or that article in the magazine you were dreaming of seeing yourself published in.

Never take the chiding or ridicule seriously. Maybe they are secretly jealous of you, seeing you reading your draft of your writing project, looking like you are not spending your time more responsibly and wishing they had the time to do what you are doing. It’s them, not you. Treat this the way you would if you got a rejection letter. File it away and keep writing. Keep writing because you are not writing for them; you are writing for you, the editors, your readers.

That’s what matters. Own it and be responsible for it. Getting angry is giving them another reason to harass you for not following your heart and work instead on an oil rig- -anything that makes “actual money!” See it from their perspective. If you follow all these suggestions, you may persuade them to see yours. They may even offer help or suggestions.

Good luck!

 

The Great Debate: FanFic

Fan Fiction. Where do you stand on the big debate? I am personally neutral on the matter, as I see the arguments to both sides, but I’m still curious. How do other writers feel about fan fiction?

By its very definition, fan fiction, or fanfic, is a written genre where canonical elements such as characters, settings, plot lines, or specific scenes from already published works are then used to create new fiction. Given this piggybacking nature of the genre, the whole concept of fanfic has stirred a great debate amongst authors, publishers, and readers as to whether or not fanfic is blatant plagiarism or a form of inspiration on which to build new work? Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, right?

On one side of the debate, there are those who are absolutely against it. And perhaps one of the biggest arguments against fanfic is that many see it as plagiarism. Most people who argue against allowing fanfic to be a thing, see it a direct rip-off of work that has already been published. There are plenty of authors, such as George R. R. Martin, who greatly despise fanfic. And I’m sure we can all see that argument, why write about someone else’s characters when you can just create your own? 

Another argument against fanfic is that it’s all just sexualized trash based off different ships. For anyone who may have forayed into a fandom to check out some fanfic, you know what I’m talking about. If you were to google Harry Potterfanfic right now, I guarantee you that 90% of it will be Harry getting it on with Ron, Harry and Hermione, Draco and Hermione, or Harry and Draco. Either way, a lot of fanfic does seem to go the way of the ships – whether they make sense or not (Adam Taurus and Blake Belladonna anyone?).

But there is a counter argument in favor of fanfic. Mostly, some people see it as a stepping stone to other, more authentic works of fiction. The best example of this in our modern day is 50 Shades of Grey. What started off as Twilightfanfic ended up taking on a life of its own. And regardless of how you feel about the series, there is no denying the massive success it experienced once the characters morphed into Christian Grey and Anastasia Steele.

With that in mind, there are plenty of fanfic writers who would argue that its simply an exercise in aspiring writers to practice their development of original writing. Writers all have to start somewhere, so by using fanfic as a sort of memetic exercise, one could argue that fanfic writing allows aspiring writers the chance to better understand how to construct a work of fiction, by essentially rearranging a favorite work of theirs. This time of response shows fanfic in a more approachable light as it establishes writing not as the focus of a perfect, finished product, but rather as a process. 

So, with that in mind, the great debate continues. What do you guys as both writers and readers think? Are you in favor of fanfic? Are you against it? Or are you like me and pretty neutral on the whole thing?