Author Interview with Laura Q. Jimenez

Dragon Soul Press had an opportunity to sit down to interview Author Laura Q. Jimenez. She is featured in DSP’s Imperial Devices.


  1. Have you always wanted to be a writer?

I’m not sure at what point I seriously started to think about being a writer. As a kid, my favorite thing in the world was to get lost in daydreams. I’d disappear into my own head, sometimes for days at a time, and only re-emerge when that particular adventure ran its course. At some point in my pre-teen years, I worried that I would forget the wild and wondrous tales I dreamt up, so I started writing them down and never stopped. It probably wasn’t until a few years later, in high school, that the idea of being someone who writes professionally occurred to me.

  1. What comes first, the plot or characters?

Character. Always character. I start from a point of someone interesting. Either someone who is visually striking, or has a fascinating personality, or a memorable background. Then I explore. Who are they? What do they do? When faced with a nail-biting problem, how do they react? Figuring out how the problem actually plays out or is solved, i.e. the plot, comes much later in the process.

  1. How many plot ideas are just waiting to be written? Can you tell us about one?

So, so many. Someone much smarter than me once said that ideas are like grains of sand at the beach. You can’t help stepping on them, and they get everywhere, in your hair, in your teeth. The challenge is figuring out which ones are good or interesting enough to be worth writing about.

The book I am currently working on is an urban fantasy that centers on a young woman who is slowly cracking like a porcelain doll but instead of blood, the split skin reveals solid gold underneath. All she knows is that she’s experiencing a sudden thirst for violence, that a smiling demon keeps crossing her path, and that she might be falling in love with the girl next door. Now she has to race against time to figure out what is happening to her and how to stop it before she crumbles into so many shiny shards.

  1. Who is the author you most admire in your genre?

That is a tough choice. There are so many extremely talented authors writing in science fiction and fantasy. At the very top of the list stands Neil Gaiman, arm in arm with Terry Pratchett. Good Omens was the first title I ever read with either of their names on it. I now have a signed copy on a special place on my shelf, dog-eared and water-logged, but still my favorite.

Gaiman creates brilliant worlds that evoke a very particular time in life but are simultaneously timeless. Meanwhile, Pratchett saw the real world and painted over it with a satirical brush, creating hilarious social commentary that was scathing in its intensity.

Other amazing individuals who have shaped my reading and writing more recently, and that I absolutely can’t not mention, include V.E. Schwab, N.K. Jemisin, and Tamsyn Muir. Octavia Butler. Alix E. Harrow. I better stop before this turns into a five-thousand word manifesto. Chuck Wendig. Delilah Dawson. Okay, okay, I’ll stop.

  1. What are you reading now?

I am one of those people who has at least three or four books in the works at a time, switching between them depending on my mood.

Thus, I am currently reading Once Upon a River, by Diane Setterfield, about a little inn by the Thames River, where a young girl drowned and was declared dead. Until she wasn’t.

I am getting ready to dive into The Harpy 2: Evolution, the second book in the Harpy series by Julie Hutchings, about Charity Blake, a young woman who turns into a vicious winged monster to wreak vengeance on those who would harm others as she was harmed in the past.

I have also just finished reading N.K. Jemison’s Broken Earth trilogy, a series about a planet angry with its human parasites, punishing them with cruel seasons and endless earthquakes; shakes that can only be stopped by those with special orogenic powers: people who are simultaneously revered for their usefulness, and reviled for the danger they pose.

  1. What do you like to do when you are not writing?

When I am not busy with my day job, writing my books, or reading the work of others, I am probably playing video games with my son (we’ve played just about every Lego title out there), or Dungeons & Dragons with my friends. There are so many ways to play games with people virtually these days, and we’ve been taking full advantage!

  1. What are the key challenges you face when writing a book?

In any project, the biggest challenge for me is probably The End. Beginnings are fun and easy, like a new relationship. Actually, it very much is a relationship. It most often feels like I’m trying to woo the story into existence. At the outset, everything is exciting, butterflies in our bellies, just getting to know one another. Even the middle isn’t too terrible. We’ve had some spats, we’re learning to navigate the other’s emotional baggage, making compromises. But the end is always a struggle. All the loose ends must be tied up, the emotional delivery has to resonate, the breakup has to be clean. In short, even if the reader isn’t happy, they have to feel closure.

It’s one thing I cannot say I’ve completely mastered, but as with all things, we keep working at it, and get better every time!

  1. Share something your readers wouldn’t know about you.

Most people don’t know that I studied anatomy on cadavers as an undergrad. I’m an exercise physiologist by trade so I have to be intimately familiar with every bone, muscle, and joint in the human body. That meant spending a semester visiting the medical campus once a week, getting elbow-deep into one dead body or another, and frequently leaving past sundown, still covered in bits and juices, and smelling like your tenth grade Biology lab. Ah, the good old days.

  1. If you had to describe yourself in three words, what would they be?

Academic Forest Goblin.

I should probably explain what that means, but I think it’s more fun if I don’t. Whatever you’re imagining is probably close enough.

10. Where can readers learn more about you?

Website, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Amazon.

Author Interview with Isabella Cheung

Dragon Soul Press sat down with Author Isabella Cheung for an interview. She is a featured author in DSP’s Lost Love anthology.

  1. When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I don’t think I really considered myself a ‘writer’ until I reached eleventh grade in high school. I’ve been writing for fun ever since I was a child, but I never really thought of it as something I could succeed in until I started doing it more. I was more-so into the fine arts (to specify, drawing) up until that year, when I took a Creative Writing course. Being in that class somewhat introduced me to writing for myself, rather than in a strictly academic fashion.

  1. What is the most difficult part about writing for you?

My writing/creative process tends to come in little bursts, which makes it difficult to bang out an entire story all in one day. For me, good ideas tend to come late at night (a decent amount past midnight!), so I’m consistently stuck trying to decide whether to get a good night’s sleep or write! (It’s usually the latter).

  1. How do you come up with the titles to your books?

I usually don’t come up with a title until I’ve finished writing the story in its entirety, and even then, it can be somewhat difficult for me. I tend to try and pick-out words or phrases that catch my eye throughout the story.

  1. Who is your favorite character?

In the stories that I’ve written, my favorite character would probably be Irina, a fallen angel from my most recent story, An Angel’s Desire. From other series that I’ve read, my all-time favourite character would be Will Herondale from Cassandra Clare’s The Infernal Devices.

  1. Are you working on anything at the present you would like to share with your readers about?

While I haven’t made much progress on it recently, having to balance different workloads, I am in the process of drafting my first novel, which will hopefully be part of a four-book series in the future.

  1. On a typical day, how much time do you spend writing?

Being an English Major, I tend to do a fair bit of academic writing throughout a typical day. I try to fit in at least fifteen minutes of writing in my free-time, whether that be planning for an upcoming project, or even a bit of drafting. Recently, I’ve had a bit of time off, so I have been writing a lot for my current WIP.

  1. Who is your favorite author and why?

I don’t think I could narrow it down to one author in particular, but a few whose works I tend to enjoy are: Cassandra Clare, Rick Riordan, Sarah J Maas, and Leigh Bardugo. Reading their stories is like stepping into an entirely different world and having the adventure of a lifetime. I think it’s cool to be able to read their books and think about the amount of planning and creativity it takes to invent these mystical worlds, and then apply it to my own writing.

  1. What do you like to do when you are not writing?

Funnily enough, when I’m not writing I tend to be ingesting hockey in any sort of way (reading articles, scrolling through game highlights, etc.). I’m a huge fan of my hometown team, the Vancouver Canucks, and find the sport fascinating to watch. Playing it, on the other hand… it’s safe to say that I probably shouldn’t be put in skates too often!

  1. What are you reading now?

One of my friends recently managed to get me started on Sarah J Maas’s Throne Of Glass series, so I’m currently burning my way through those books. I’ve also recently read Stalking Jack the Ripper, by Kerri Maniscalco, and These Violent Delights, by Chloe Gong, both of which are great books for those who are big fans of mystery and historical fiction, like myself.

  1. Where can readers learn more about you?

I’m currently in the process of setting up a website for myself, but I’m available on Facebook, Instagram, and Linktree.

Author Interview with Ashley L. Hunt

Dragon Soul Press sat down to interview Fairytale Dragons Author Ashley L. Hunt.


  1. Where do you get your inspiration?

My inspiration comes from a lot of places. Sometimes it’s a way I had wished another story ended. Some of it is adventures I would have loved going on, if they were possible. (Anyone know where I can team up with a dragon?) Sometimes characters just form and they need places to go.

  1. When did you start writing?

I was very young, I remember that. When I was 3 or 4, my brother and I would get all our toys and we would send them on these long epic odyssey to reach a goal. I didn’t think to set my stories to paper until I was 9 or so.

  1. What does success mean to you? What is the definition of success?

Success to me is completing a task and getting some acknowledgement for it. It’s probably on the smaller scale of what success means to others, but it’s good for me.

  1. How much ‘world building’ takes place before you start writing?

It’s a little bit before and some after. I leave space to build as I go, but I have enough foundation for a solid world.

  1. Describe your perfect book hero or heroine.

A perfect book hero is someone who is flawed, someone who gets scared or isn’t always sure, but does their best anyway. For me, they need to do what they can to make the world better, and they learn a lesson on the way.

  1. What was the inspiration for the Fairytale Dragons story?

I’ve been studying fairy tales since I was a child and I absolutely love dragons. Cinderella is easy to mock because in today’s day and age she looks weak. It’s not fair because she was a brave and courageous young woman who stands up and she bears her part well. She deserves better and I hope I gave her that.

  1. What were the key challenges you faced when writing this story?

In the original, Cinderella is passive and docile. She reacts to the plot rather than inspiring it. The plot happens around her. So I had to give her an active role in the story. Her godmother is also this strange shadow in the background who shows up randomly then vanishes from the story again. (According to the French telling, she’s absent in the German and Italian) so an added challenge was to show a relationship with Cinderella and her godmother while giving her a reason to not help Cinderella.

  1. Who is your favorite author and why?

Favorite author is harder to pin because there are so many for a million different reasons. Madame Du’alnoy stands out among fairytale writers because she has a particular style to her writing that is rich but doesn’t bog down the story. My favorite book is the Wizard of Oz, by Lymen Frank Baum so of course he has a special place on.

  1. What was your dream job when you were younger?

I wanted to be a singer, but I can’t hold a note. My dog runs up to check if I’m dying.

  1. Where can readers learn more about you?

You can find me on Facebook.

View at Medium.com

Author Interview with Andrea J. Hargrove

Dragon Soul Press sat down to interview Fairytale Dragons Author Andrea J. Hargrove.


  1. Who is the author you most admire in your genre?

The author I most admire in the fantasy genre is J.R.R. Tolkien because of the way he made his magical and fantastical stories feel real, especially in his Lord of the Rings trilogy and related works. He was able to draw on his own experiences fighting in a war when fleshing out the conflict in his stories, and more importantly, how that conflict affected both the soldiers and the civilians. Then he took that foundation and layered his own carefully-crafted world on top of that, including fully-realized histories, cultures, maps, and even his own invented languages. Finally, he put memorable, fully-formed characters into that world and gave them some incredible adventures. That level of craft and commitment is something I admire and aspire to.

  1. Do you listen to audiobooks?

I like to listen to audiobooks while I’m doing things like knitting, painting, or chores that take a long time, because I don’t want to keep stopping and re-starting the story. For the same reason, I don’t usually listen to them on my daily commute, but I usually play one or two on longer road trips.

  1. What do you like to do when you are not writing?

Besides reading, I have a few different hobbies that help clear my head. I go on short walks almost daily and longer backpacking trips as time permits. I’ve recently started kayaking, too, in warm weather. Fortunately, I also like some things that can happen year-round. For instance, I like to dabble in various arts and crafts (without too much success so far, though that won’t stop me from experimenting). I also study kenjutsu and iaijutsu (samurai sword arts) at a nearby martial arts dojo.

  1. Where did you get your inspiration for the Fairytale Dragons story?

The timing of this anthology worked out really well for me. This year, library where I work had the Summer Reading Program theme of “Imagine Your Story”, celebrating fairy tales, fantasy, and mythology. As a result, I’ve been immersed in these since we started preparing last winter. We had to cancel or modify most of our programs due to quarantine, but the theme stayed the same, which made me happy, since it’s one of my favorites so far.

During this whole process, I brushed up on lots of old stories, and one that was on my mind when I saw the call for submissions to Fairytale Dragons was The Frog Prince. It seemed like a natural transition, since humans being transformed into animals is a common staple in a lot of fairytales, and someone being transformed into a dragon would create a whole new spectrum of problems. This is what I wanted to explore in The Golden Arrow. Before I started writing, though, I re-read a few different versions of the tale. I was most familiar with the version told by the Brothers Grimm, but it’s been retold many different ways in many different places. Besides the Grimm tale, I also drew inspiration from another German version and a tale from Russia called The Frog Princess.

  1. Are you currently working on anything new?

I’m simultaneously working on my first novel and putting the finishing touches on two more short stories that I’ll be submitting for consideration to upcoming fantasy anthologies.

  1. What famous author do you wish would be your mentor?

Though he isn’t primarily known for his speculative fiction, I would want James Patterson as a mentor. He has an incredible ability to connect with readers across genres and age groups. At my library, I’ve talked to kids, teens, and adults who’ve all gotten hooked on his page-turners, and I think I’d have a lot to learn from him.

  1. What’s your favorite food?

Breads of any kind are my weakness, especially blueberry muffins. I try not to bake these too frequently, since they disappear far sooner than they should.

  1. If you had to describe yourself in three words, what would they be?

Curious, quiet, & hopeful.

  1. What’s your favorite spot to visit in your own country?

Locally, there’s a park where I go to walk and to write a lot. I also like visiting relatives and spending time with them where they live, but besides these places, my favorite spot to visit is the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. It’s packed full of stories from different people in different places and different times, and those stories are told in a beautiful way.

  1. Where can readers learn more about you?

On my blog, Amazon, Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.

Author Interview with Robert Prescott

Dragon Soul Press took a moment to interview All Dark Places 2 Author Robert Prescott.


1. What inspired you to start writing?

I caught the bug in high school through reading. I read a lot of fantasy and horror, and I was enthralled with the world building and relationships between the characters I was reading about. That led to me writing my own stories, which I’d bring to my creative writing teacher for feedback.

2. What advice would you give a new writer, someone just starting out?

Don’t do what I did. After high school I let writing fall by the wayside because of my career and other creative outlets like music. It was only in the last year or so that I rediscovered how much I love telling stories, and now that I’m refocused, I regret the time I lost. Aside from that, I’d say don’t be afraid to submit your work. Be confident in yourself and your story—all they can say is no, right? That doesn’t mean someone else won’t say yes. Lastly, make sure every part of your submission (the story, the body of your e-mail, your author bio) are all fully proofread and professionally presented.

3. How do you handle writer’s block?

How do you come up with the titles to your books? I’ve only written short stories so far, and I usually look for a common theme in the story to help me with the title. In The Cell Block, that theme was obvious since the entire story takes place in the town jail. I did the same thing for another story of mine titled Black Friday.

4. How do you do research for your books?

I’ve mostly used the internet to find what I need. It can be risky due to the loads of misinformation on the web, but if you take your time you can find a lot of good primary and secondary sources for your topic, and even peer reviewed articles if your story contains more technical or scientific aspects.

5. Who is your favorite author and why?

Stephen King. He’s probably the main author who inspired me to write. Any time I’m describing what a character is thinking or feeling during a scene, it’s because I read so much of that in his work.

6. What do you like to do when you are not writing?

When I’m not writing I’m either playing guitar (mostly rock and hard rock), gaming (PC, Xbox, or Switch), spending time with my girlfriend, or reading.

7. Favorite artist and favorite song?

Music is a huge part of my life—there are too many artists to pick a favorite! Right now I’ve got “Blood From Above” by Stryper on heavy rotation, and I’ve also been listening to a lot of Metallica, ZZ Top, and Rush.

8. What are you reading now?

I just started re-reading The Night Angel Trilogy by Brent Weeks.

9. What’s your favorite food?

Italian food, definitely. Manicotti, lasagna, and spaghetti are some of my favorites.

10. Where can readers learn more about you?

My Amazon author page, Facebook author page, and lastly, my Instagram author account.