Author Interview with David Allen Voyles

Dragon Soul Press took a moment to interview All Dark Places 2 Author David Allen Voyles.


1. What books or authors have most influenced your own writing?

I taught literature for nearly thirty years so it’s hard to say which writers I enjoyed the most—there are so many. But I can identify these three as having a tremendous impact on me: Edgar Allen Poe for defining what horror is, Ray Bradbury for teaching me the sheer pleasure and poetry that a story can offer, and Stephen King for providing me with superb models of terrifying plots and believable characters.

2. Where do you draw inspiration from?

I’ve always loved Halloween. My family and I have hosted a Halloween party for the past forty years, most of which had their own creepy theme. Early on we incorporated the idea of storytelling into the fun. We always encouraged our guests to share a scary story, but I made sure I had at least one ready to tell myself. One year our theme was “Dark Tours” and I escorted small groups of guests around the property, through the house, and even on a walk in the neighboring woods and told stories about the haunted scenes we had prepared for them in all those places. The success of that party led to the idea of creating our own ghost tour business, and within a year, we had purchased and renovated a 1972 Cadillac hearse in which we transported our customers to various haunted sites in our area. I had to create stories for the tours, of course, which was great fun, but that experience encouraged me to write stories much darker than those I could tell on a family-friendly ghost tour and to eventually publish two collections of original short stories.

3. Have you always wanted to be a writer?

I think so, yes. In elementary school I enjoyed writing stories even when they weren’t assigned. Later I decided that I wanted to be an English teacher and have my own class where I could get students excited about the wealth of literature that awaited them. Writing is a large part of the English class curriculum, too, of course, and I enjoyed writing creatively with my students.

4. What do you like to do when you are not writing?

As I said, Halloween is a big part of my life. This year, due to Covid-19, the celebration will have to be a virtual one, so I haven’t devoted as much time to making props for the party as I normally do, but making skulls, corpses, haunted trees, and tombstones for our annual haunted scenes is a hobby I very much enjoy. I’ve also recently become interested in puppetry and hope to find time to create the characters for several scary puppet shows that I’ve written the scripts for. Yes, that’s right. I said scary puppet shows. As if puppets aren’t scary enough as they are! Am I right?

5. If you were a tour guide, what would you like a visitor to see and what impression would you want them to take away with them when they leave?

For three years I had the pleasure of being the ghost tour guide for my own small business, Dark Ride Tours. As the fictitious undertaker/host Virgil Nightshade (“Virgil” from Dante’s guide throughout Hell in The Inferno, and “Nightshade” from one of Ray Bradbury’s young protagonists in Something Wicked This Way Comes), I wanted guests to experience the spine-tingling thrill that comes from a good, scary story. And to wonder if–just maybe–ghosts might be real.

6. Do you write listening to music?

Not always, but often I listen to dark, ambient music. I do not listen to songs with vocals, however, as lyrics seem to conflict with my ability to write. I’m currently in the process of writing episodes for the ongoing story of Witch-Works for my horror podcast Dark Corners which is based on an existing dark ambient music album of the same name by the wonderful musician/composer Mombi Yuleman. Each chapter in the story is based on a track of the album, so I most definitely listen to those dark sounds while I’m writing. My collaboration with Mombi has led me to search out more dark ambient music, which I find perfect for creating a mood conducive to writing good horror.

7. Is there lots to do before you dive in and start writing the story?

It really depends on the story. Sometimes all it takes is to think of a creepy idea and jump in. Other storylines take more work. For example, I’ve been asked to contribute to a horror anthology that will accompany a collection of Lovecraft-inspired music, so I re-read a few Lovecraft stories and researched a bit about Lovecraft’s Elder Gods and his cosmos in order to figure out how to incorporate some of his elements into my unique tale. I am outlining the plot now and looking forward to fleshing out the story. So I guess you’d definitely call me a “planner” rather than a “pantser.”

8. What is the most difficult part about writing for you?

I love all aspects of the actual writing process—the planning, the first draft (probably my favorite part), even the editing. What I really don’t like is having to promote my writing. Social media is a necessary evil these days, but it siphons off so much time away from actually writing that I find it a frustrating distraction.

9. When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I don’t think I thought of myself as being a real writer until I connected with Gestalt Media, a small publishing company dedicated to promoting indie writers. I had self-published my first collection, The Thirteenth Day of Christmas and Other Tales of Yuletide Horror, but I was still hesitant to say, “I’m a writer.” I think it took finding someone else who didn’t know me aside from my writing and who seemed to think that other people might like to buy my stories for me to feel myself really a writer.

10. What is the significance of the title for your All Dark Places 2 story?

I’d like to think that there is a sense of prevailing justice to life, or perhaps more specifically, some kind of karma. It galls me to think of some of the despicable people we see today being rewarded for their selfish, thoughtless, and destructive behaviors. The idea of “Just Retribution,” where someone who has lived a life devoted to harmful self-interest ultimately gets what they deserve is, I know, simplistic to say the least. But aside from providing me with an opportunity to include a scene that once terrified me in a dream (the ultimate haunted house), the story satisfies my need, for at least once in my universe, for things to work out as they should in the end. Very few of my stories do that.

11. Where can readers learn more about you?

Website: davidallenvoyles.com

Horror Podcast: Dark Corners with David Allen Voyles (Available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and here: gestalt-media.com/darkcorners)

Facebook: David Allen Voyles @DavidAVoyles13

Twitter: @davidavoyles

Instagram: davidallenvoyles

Interested readers are also welcome to sign up for my bi-weekly newsletter by downloading the free story “Captain Buchanan’s Return” at http://dl.bookfunnel.com/y83ic544jh

Author Interview with Crystal Liechty

After hearing about her new release, Dragon Soul Press sat down with Author Crystal Liechty to interview her about First: Get Caught.



1. What inspired you to start writing?
My mother was a writer so I grew up writing. I’m not sure when I started or if I’ll ever stop. It’s just what I do. What inspired this particular book? Definitely my love of Korean dramas. They know how to do romance in ways that really pull you in and make you care about the characters. I tried to study that out, see how they did it, and replicate that in First: Get Caught.

2. What is the most difficult part about writing for you?
Finding time. I homeschool three kids, volunteer in my community, work from home, take care of my house. It’s near impossible to find quiet snippets of time where I can just sink into my own imagination and play there a bit.

3. Where do you get your inspiration?
I listen to music. Read poetry. Watch Korean dramas. Talk through plot ideas with friends. Write, decide it’s terrible, and try again.

4. What is the future for the characters? Will there be a sequel?
Yes! This is the first book in a series and each new book will follow the love story of a new character in Abigail’s friend group. The second book will be Hannah’s love story.

5. What do you hope your readers take away from this book?
Honestly, I try not to think too deeply about stuff like that because it paralyzes me. All I want is for readers to enjoy the book. Laugh a bit, get caught up in the love story, and just have a good time reading.

6. What was the highlight of writing this book?
I had so much fun watching Ben fall in love with Abigail because of who she is, not what she looks like. I really tried to build their relationship around more than the initial physical attraction (though obviously that initial attraction is a big deal since Abigail’s obsession with Ben’s looks is what starts the whole thing).

7. How many plot ideas are just waiting to be written? Can you tell us about one?
So many! As I mention earlier, I’m working on book 2 in the series. Hannah, Abigail’s best friend, will have to overcome her paralyzing fear of singing in public to perform in the school’s talent show in order to help a friend. And of course, she’ll find love along the way.

8. Who is your favorite author and why?
This is like asking me to pick a favorite child! There are so many amazing authors, that I wouldn’t know where to begin. But the author I’ve read over and over and over would be Jane Austen. Probably a cliché answer, but the lady knew her stuff. She was a genius. There’s no getting around it.

9. What do you like to do when you are not writing?
Naps. Naps are my favorite thing. I also study TaeKwonDo, do archery, try to paint like Bob Ross, and play with my kids.

10. If your book was to be made into a movie, who are the celebrities that would star in it?
Ben was highly inspired by the Korean actor, Lee Won-keun! I think if she were a little younger, Karen Gillan would make a perfect Abigail.

11. Where can readers learn more about you?

Please follow me on my Facebook author page!

If you like comics, you can also follow my Educating Mom comic, in which I make fun of the trials of being a homeschooling mom.

Author Interview with Kortney Gallagher

Dragon Soul Press sat down to interview Author Kortney Gallagher after her appearance in the Lethal Impact anthology.


1. What inspired you to start writing?

I don’t like to think it was one single thing that inspired me to start writing. The plot to my favorite books excited me, the death of a fantastic character awed me, my children’s support pushes me, and the desire just to write for fun keeps me going, inspiring me to write every day. Which one began it? I couldn’t say.

2. What comes first, the plot or characters?

The characters, I sit and make a list of characters, I usually begin with five to ten, all intertwining, and one unrelated oddball, who is maybe a bit eccentric. I give those characters meaning, emotions, family ties, and personalities, then I decide what kind of chaos I am going to send them through in the next book plot.

3. What is the most difficult part about writing for you?

The most difficult part about writing for me is probably finding the time to write; between family, friends, work and outside obligations, sometimes I have to force myself to sit down and write for ten to fifteen minutes. I used to carry around a small journal that I started my first ever plot idea in, but I had more time to write by hand than to type, and got terribly behind.

4. What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?

I get all of my writing ideas straight from my very own dreams, sometimes I wake up at super odd hours and make myself random voice notes, just to wake up the next day and realize they make no sense at all.

5. What does success mean to you? What is the definition of success?

Dictionary.com says the definition of success is “The accomplishment of an aim or purpose.”

My purpose is to write; if I can write forever, even if I am the only one that reads it, I am successful.

6. Where do you get your inspiration?

Since a lot of my ideas do come to me in dreams, I imagine my inspirations come from my everyday life; a silly thing one of my daycare children say or do, a smart remark from one of my teens, a movie or show I binge-watched before bed. Possibly even way too much sugar before sleep.

7. Who is your favorite author and why?

If Cassandra Clare and Stephanie Meyers made a book baby together, I would be in heaven. I enjoy both of their writing styles so much and always look forward to new releases from them.

8. What do you like to do when you are not writing?

I run a full-time in-home daycare, raise my four children who are 5, 10, 13 and 14, cook, clean, play with my cats or dog, binge read new books and sometimes I have a cup of coffee and stare out the window for no reason what-so-ever, to help my brain relax.

9. Who is your hero?

I have three heroes, people I can only hope to be someday. Michael Bixby, my fifth-grade teacher, although I am an adult, I still remember the fifth grade, how hard and confusing it was. Mr.Bixby not only helped me through it, but encouraged me to move above and beyond it, pushing me to be the very best me I can be, and still to this day I try to live up to that standard. My father, who worked hard my entire childhood to raise me to be the person I am today and my mother, who struggled with addiction her entire life, and is over a year clean and sober today, showing me it’s never too late to change your life forever.

10. Where can readers learn more about you?

Facebook is my favorite social media app. https://www.facebook.com/kortney.gallagher.56/

Instagram is also great, Instagram.com/author_Kortneyg

Why You Still Need an Editor After Multiple Books #2

A question that often comes up for seasoned authors: “do I still need an editor? I have x number of books under my belt now. Surely I can self-edit to save money and time.

Famous authors like J.K. Rowling, R.A. Salvatore, Stephen King, etc. still use their editors. Why? They’ve written multiple books and have been writing for years. Shouldn’t they be self-sufficient by now?

Writing a book and editing a book is not the same thing. That’s why an extensive process has been created for publishing. Yes, your work will definitely improve over the years if you continue honing your skills and pay attention to some of the things your editors suggest. There will still be mistakes that another pair of eyes need to catch.

You may be thinking at this point of the article that “It’s okay. I’ll have my best friend or family member read over it and it’ll provide a professional result.” This is often not the case. Even someone who reads books extensively or has an actual college degree in English won’t be able to catch all of the mistakes. Degrees are a piece of paper awarded to someone who completes courses. It doesn’t show their experience or dedication to the work.

Normally, there are three stages to editing: Structural/Developmental, Line Editing, Copy Editing. Laid out like that, it looks easy, but it’s far from simple. A manuscript is normally read through and edited a minimum of five times. Professionals who have studied current genres, story structures, sentence structures, etc. are worth having edit your story and getting it to a traditional publishing level, whether you are attempting that route or self-publishing. Readers expect professionalism and will stop reading after finding mistakes in the book.

But that’s okay. I’ve already established a reader base.” It’s extremely easy to lose readers once they realize your future books are not up to par with the others. The more books you release, the better they are expected to become. Not the opposite.

Continued from
Why You Shouldn’t Withdraw Your Submission Early

To be continued in a later blog post called
Why You Should Keep Improving Your Skills