Author Interview with Kortney Gallagher

Dragon Soul Press sat down to interview Author Kortney Gallagher after her appearance in the Lethal Impact anthology.


1. What inspired you to start writing?

I don’t like to think it was one single thing that inspired me to start writing. The plot to my favorite books excited me, the death of a fantastic character awed me, my children’s support pushes me, and the desire just to write for fun keeps me going, inspiring me to write every day. Which one began it? I couldn’t say.

2. What comes first, the plot or characters?

The characters, I sit and make a list of characters, I usually begin with five to ten, all intertwining, and one unrelated oddball, who is maybe a bit eccentric. I give those characters meaning, emotions, family ties, and personalities, then I decide what kind of chaos I am going to send them through in the next book plot.

3. What is the most difficult part about writing for you?

The most difficult part about writing for me is probably finding the time to write; between family, friends, work and outside obligations, sometimes I have to force myself to sit down and write for ten to fifteen minutes. I used to carry around a small journal that I started my first ever plot idea in, but I had more time to write by hand than to type, and got terribly behind.

4. What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?

I get all of my writing ideas straight from my very own dreams, sometimes I wake up at super odd hours and make myself random voice notes, just to wake up the next day and realize they make no sense at all.

5. What does success mean to you? What is the definition of success?

Dictionary.com says the definition of success is “The accomplishment of an aim or purpose.”

My purpose is to write; if I can write forever, even if I am the only one that reads it, I am successful.

6. Where do you get your inspiration?

Since a lot of my ideas do come to me in dreams, I imagine my inspirations come from my everyday life; a silly thing one of my daycare children say or do, a smart remark from one of my teens, a movie or show I binge-watched before bed. Possibly even way too much sugar before sleep.

7. Who is your favorite author and why?

If Cassandra Clare and Stephanie Meyers made a book baby together, I would be in heaven. I enjoy both of their writing styles so much and always look forward to new releases from them.

8. What do you like to do when you are not writing?

I run a full-time in-home daycare, raise my four children who are 5, 10, 13 and 14, cook, clean, play with my cats or dog, binge read new books and sometimes I have a cup of coffee and stare out the window for no reason what-so-ever, to help my brain relax.

9. Who is your hero?

I have three heroes, people I can only hope to be someday. Michael Bixby, my fifth-grade teacher, although I am an adult, I still remember the fifth grade, how hard and confusing it was. Mr.Bixby not only helped me through it, but encouraged me to move above and beyond it, pushing me to be the very best me I can be, and still to this day I try to live up to that standard. My father, who worked hard my entire childhood to raise me to be the person I am today and my mother, who struggled with addiction her entire life, and is over a year clean and sober today, showing me it’s never too late to change your life forever.

10. Where can readers learn more about you?

Facebook is my favorite social media app. https://www.facebook.com/kortney.gallagher.56/

Instagram is also great, Instagram.com/author_Kortneyg

Why You Still Need an Editor After Multiple Books #2

A question that often comes up for seasoned authors: “do I still need an editor? I have x number of books under my belt now. Surely I can self-edit to save money and time.

Famous authors like J.K. Rowling, R.A. Salvatore, Stephen King, etc. still use their editors. Why? They’ve written multiple books and have been writing for years. Shouldn’t they be self-sufficient by now?

Writing a book and editing a book is not the same thing. That’s why an extensive process has been created for publishing. Yes, your work will definitely improve over the years if you continue honing your skills and pay attention to some of the things your editors suggest. There will still be mistakes that another pair of eyes need to catch.

You may be thinking at this point of the article that “It’s okay. I’ll have my best friend or family member read over it and it’ll provide a professional result.” This is often not the case. Even someone who reads books extensively or has an actual college degree in English won’t be able to catch all of the mistakes. Degrees are a piece of paper awarded to someone who completes courses. It doesn’t show their experience or dedication to the work.

Normally, there are three stages to editing: Structural/Developmental, Line Editing, Copy Editing. Laid out like that, it looks easy, but it’s far from simple. A manuscript is normally read through and edited a minimum of five times. Professionals who have studied current genres, story structures, sentence structures, etc. are worth having edit your story and getting it to a traditional publishing level, whether you are attempting that route or self-publishing. Readers expect professionalism and will stop reading after finding mistakes in the book.

But that’s okay. I’ve already established a reader base.” It’s extremely easy to lose readers once they realize your future books are not up to par with the others. The more books you release, the better they are expected to become. Not the opposite.

Continued from
Why You Shouldn’t Withdraw Your Submission Early

To be continued in a later blog post called
Why You Should Keep Improving Your Skills

Why You Shouldn’t Withdraw Your Submission Early #1

After being in the business for so long, one ends up seeing multiple dreams being squashed or coming true. One of the worst things is getting in your own way and causing everything to crash and burn. This has occurred many times and as such, has warranted this article.

Many publishers have the option of manuscript and anthology submissions. When someone submits to both outlets and one gets rejected, the automatic response is to withdraw all submissions from that publisher. This is the wrong way to do things. Just because one thing was rejected does not mean everything will be.

There are so many possibilities as to why it was refused. Some of the most common reasons is it needed more editing or that story didn’t fit in that particular anthology. No matter the reason, none is cause to withdraw all of your submissions. More often than not, the publisher is planning on accepting one even though another was rejected.

The reason many authors are not successful with traditional publishing is because they don’t follow submission guidelines and once refused, they automatically give up. “Self-publishing is such an easier way to go” has been a saying going around writing communities. It may be easier, but you will never have the same opportunities that traditional publishing gives. And so, the story that was rejected due to poor editing is uploaded for self-publishing without further improvement and gets nowhere with sales.

The worst of all is that, more often than not, the author never continues improving their writing. Critique is the most important way to continue honing your writing skills. If you think you’re already the best and have nothing further to improve, then you’re already in the wrong mindset.

To be continued in a later blog post called
Why You Still Need an Editor After Multiple Books