Introducing Author Kelli Pizarro

Dragon Soul Press proudly presents Christian Fiction Author Kelli Pizarro has joined the ranks! Delightful tales are coming soon. Here is an interview with the author herself!

  1. Do you think writers have a normal life like others?
    I think the harder question to answer is, what is a normal life? I think we all share the aspects of life most could consider common ground such as love, faith, family, and all that fills in the in-between. I think the only thing that separates us from the rest is the amount of hours spent typing at a keyboard, tears shed over imaginary friends, and an almost-incriminating Google search history.authorlogo
  2. What would you say is the easiest aspect of writing?
    The research stage. It comes easy to me because I enjoy it so much. When I was very young, I would copy pages in the Encyclopedia for fun. Now, hours on the web and trips to my books’ setting locations are a grown-up version of that nerdery, and what drives me to write more.
  3. Do you read much and if so who are your favorite authors?
    I read as much as I write! Francine Rivers, Liz Curtis Higgs, Melinda Inman, Celena Janton, Frank Peretti, and Lisa Tawn Bergren are my go-to authors for consistently great reads.
  4. Have you ever left any of your books to stew for months on end or even a year?
    Only Shanty by the Sea. It was the first book I started, and my most recent finish. I had to grow as the story did, both as a writer and as an individual, in order to see it to completion.
  5. What is the most important thing about a book in your opinion?
    That it makes you feel. I don’t mind so much what emotion it evokes, as long as it does so deeply.
  6. Any advice you would like to give to aspiring writers?
    Finish that first draft. Make time to write, often. And don’t compromise your voice as an author: be open to constructive criticism, but don’t lose your voice.
  7. How much of yourself do you put into your books?
    I put a huge amount of my time, energy, and heart into my books. They are the little pieces of me I will leave in the world when I am gone. They are the stories my children and grandchildren will see and know that imagination and creativity are important parts of being human.
  8. Who are your books mostly dedicated to?
    The God I serve and the readers who support my writing.
  9. How do you see writing? As a hobby or a passion?
    Both. The amount of time spent writing during a particular season in my life may make it easier to categorize what my writing is to me at that time, but altogether, it is both hobby and passion.
  10. Where can readers learn more about you?
    They can learn more about me by following my social media accounts! I often post updates about my writing and insights into my life on Twitter and Facebook.

 

Author’s DSP author page – https://dragonsoulpress.com/author-kelli-pizarro/

Interview with Author of “Warm Bodies” Isaac Marion

Dragon Soul Press had the great honor of interviewing Isaac Marion, author of the Warm Bodies series, during the anticipation of the release for the fourth book this past November.

You can follow the author here: Facebook, Amazon, Goodreads, Website.

 

Q: When did you decide to become a writer? What’s your genre?
I was 14 when I realized that there was no reason I couldn’t write books just like all the books I loved reading. I started right away, wrote a 1000 page epic fantasy novel, tried and failed to get it published, and went right on to the next, which was a mostly realistic story set in the town I lived in. I don’t “have a genre” any more than I “have a mood.” My genres change from story to story, or at best, they combine several.51Cw06tOHYL

Q: Where do you get your inspiration?
From looking closely at the world and people around me, noticing patterns, feeling desires, sensing mysteries. Traveling, dreaming, movies, music, and other books. From everything.

Q: Do you ever get writer’s block?  If yes, how do you overcome it?
I get it mostly between books, when I’m trying to get a new story started and I haven’t built the emotional momentum yet. That’s hard and I haven’t written enough books to have found a solution. When it happens deeper into the process, when I get stuck on a plot hole or can’t find the right approach to a scene, I usually find that physical activity helps break up the sediment and get the thoughts flowing again. Running in particular has been really helpful for me, the combination of fresh oxygen and the rush of scenery seems to clear my brain and turbo-charge it to break through those blockages. It’s remarkably effective for something so blunt and non-intellectual.

Q: What is the hardest thing for you about writing?
Generating the story. Ideas, concepts, and feelings all come easily to me, but inventing the chain of events that allow those things to unspool into a coherent story is always a challenge. Sometimes it feels like the road is going to evaporate under me while I’m walking. There’s always the fear that the answers just won’t come to me. But so far, it’s always ended up working out, so maybe I need to trust myself.

Q: Are you currently reading any books?
I just started The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro. Never Let Me Go devastated me so I go into this with high hopes, even though it seems very different in tone and subject. I’m a big fan of writers like him who weave “genre” elements into literary material without making a big deal out of it, because it shouldn’t be a big deal. A story is a story. The lines we draw between “literary” and “genre” are reductive and limiting and should be destroyed.

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Q: Can you sum up the Warm Bodies series in just a few sentences?
A dead man finds his way back to life, falls in love with a young revolutionary, and together they search for a cure to the metaphysical plague that has destroyed civilization, while fighting the bizarre corporate militia that seeks to harness those forces.

Q: How did it feel when you were finally able to share your novel, The Living, with the world?
It was like telling a secret that I’d been keeping my entire life.

Introducing Author Jordan Petrarca

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Dragon Soul Press proudly presents Author Jordan Petrarca has joined the ranks! His expertise resides in organized crime and fantasy novels. Learn more about this author here.

 

Q: Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

A: No, even though my last name looks kind of hard to pronounce, I think it’s cool and I love the Italian heritage behind it.

Q: If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

A: I would tell my younger self to not be so hard on yourself, be confident and believe in what you write. Oh, and stop being so lazy and start writing more!

Q: What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

A: When I was in sixth grade, I wrote a play called “The Murder of Big Bird” for an English assignment. The teacher loved it so much that she had me cast some of my classmates and perform it in front of the class. The classroom roared with laughter throughout the entire performance and it amazed me how much I could connect with an audience through simple words and beloved characters.

Q: What does literary success look like to you?

A: To me, literary success can be as simple as even just one person telling you how much they enjoyed reading something you wrote from your own imagination. Especially, my wife…Of course, I would love seeing the whole world enjoy it, but in the end, I just want my family to be proud of me.

Q: What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

A: The research I do for writing is simple. I watch movies, read books, and play video games that inspire me to be creative.  Years back I didn’t have the confidence to write an entire novel, but after reading over thirty books in a year, I started to believe that I had the tools to write one.

Q: How many hours a day do you write?

A: I have a fairly busy life, but when I’m writing a manuscript, I spend about four hours a day writing.  Mostly at night because I spend time with my twin girls before they go to bed.

Q: What was your hardest scene to write?

A: When I wrote Mafia University, the words flowed pretty easily because I’ve had the idea in my head for the last fifteen years.  But if I had to choose which scene was the hardest to write, it would have to be the opening scene.  It’s a brutal scene, but it makes you want to read what happens next.

Q: What is your favorite childhood book?

A: Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White

Q: How long on average does it take you to write a book?

A: It takes me about 4-6 months to write a book.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you?

A: On Facebook, on Twitter, and on my Amazon Page.

Introducing Author V.P. Allasander

logo (1)Dragon Soul Press is proud to announce Author V.P. Allasander is joining the ranks with dark, twisted fairytales! Enjoy an interview with the author himself.

Q: If you had the opportunity to live anywhere in the world for a year while writing a book that took place in that same setting, where would you choose?

I think I would love to live in New Orleans because my favorite series that I am writing now (except for the high fantasy ones) is set in Louisiana. And, ever since The Originals took off on CW, I am just in love with the French Quarter. And I do love witches and voodoo. So, yes, I would love to live there and write books one day.

Q: What has influenced you the most as a writer?

I think it is mostly reading books that made me want to tell stories. I started reading at a very young age, you see, and I picked up a lot of fantasy and mystery thrillers to read. It was when I was in the eighth grade that my English teacher had me write a short story for some competition and ever since then, I have felt the urge to write stories. I started off with short stories and then started writing fanfiction. Even now, reading books makes me want to write better stories. Apart from that, watching TV shows and observing people and the events around me has also influenced me in some respects.

Q: What is your favorite genre to read, and why?

Speculative Fiction, hands down. I prefer the fantasy side of speculative fiction (urban, high, dark, epic), but I also sometimes read post-apocalyptic, sci-fi, and dystopian. I also read a lot of horror. Since I read in this genre avidly, these are also the genres I write in.

Q: How many drafts do your books generally go through before publication?

As many drafts as are needed. However, I’ve been writing for a long time, and if my writing in the first draft is really good, it will have fewer subsequent drafts. The thing with me is I distill unnecessary plot sequences during the outlining phase itself. So, when I write, I have almost structurally edited it. Of course, my beta readers and editors may also suggest what to remove later on.

Q: What is your favorite word, and why?

Adamantine would be my favorite word. It is a synonym to ‘adamant’, but it does sound more beautiful than it. Also because that word is quite close to adamantium (read: Wolverine), though it has really no relation to it. Just because it is closer to the word in Wolverine, I love it.

Q: What is your writing Kryptonite?

Reading badly written books. It does affect my writing juju and I really get the worst story on paper or a good story badly executed, just because badly written books destroyed my mood.

Q: How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

I really cannot count. A lot of books just lie there on my PC. However, I am going to start publishing in 2019, so you can expect a marathon.

Q: If you didn’t write, what would you do instead?

Frankly speaking, I do not know what I would do if I didn’t know how to write. But if pushed hard, I would probably be in the branding segment or retail.

Q: What is your favorite childhood book?

I will definitely say anything by Enid Blyton, Franklin Dixon, and Carolyn Keene, but if you are seeking something that really influenced me, it has to be Lord of the Rings by J R R Tolkien.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you?

You can connect with me on my personal Facebook profile, Twitter, or Instagram. You can also email me. I do reply to all. As an author, I want to be accessible. And I love conversing with readers, being one myself. If you are in my city, you are also welcome to meet me personally or in the umpteen numbers of book club meetings and literature festivals I help organize.

Introducing Author Amber Morant

Joining the Dragon Soul Press growing list of authors is talented Amber Morant! An incredible series is coming soon!

Q: What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

My favorite novel would have to be Tailchaser’s Song. Where other enjoyed Tad Williams Red Wall series, I loved the development of cats and their existence in an almost fantastical world connected to our own. It was very dark and light in different moments and as a kid, it made me imagine my own cats at home going on similar adventures. I’m just sad Williams never wrote another book about Tailchaser.37522906_1755023324605094_7022020226128543744_n

Q: How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

You… definitely don’t want to know. Honestly, I think I have about two half-finished books that I am currently working on. As far as unfinished projects, they’re a dime a dozen on my drive where I thought it was a really good idea and quickly lost interest after a few thousand words within it. I may go back to them and flesh them out, but right now, I just want to keep moving forward.

Q: Have you read anything that made you think differently about fiction?

Every time I read a new piece of fiction, it makes me think differently on it. The fact that there are infinite worlds and people to discover just amazes me. Not only that, how some people can look at such similar objects or places and describe them so differently amazes me. It’s like taking a moment to pop into the mind of the author and seeing their own view of the world.

Q: What was your hardest scene to write?

Hardest scene for me to write is ironically the fight scenes. Not because they are difficult, but I sometimes get lost in the moment and then forget where exactly they are in the room. Because of this I have to sit there and act out the scene myself in a mocking way to get oriented back to where the characters are. Thankfully, I have a few swords in my collection that helps in acting out the scene.

Q: Do you think someone could be a writer if they don’t feel emotions strongly?

Of course. I’ve never suffered PTSD, but I wrote an entire book about a character who suffered it. I think if you are willing to put the time into it, you can write a book despite not feeling emotions as strongly. Not to mention, beta readers are always out there or co-authors to help you if you feel the emotions are weak. On a similar stance, but a bit more adult, I have met plenty of erotica and high heat level romance books who are asexual and they have been able to make it out there.

Q: What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

I would say it wasn’t so much I realized it when it happened but looking back it was the spark that showed me power. When I was younger, I went from reading simple books and short chapter books to full length novels. Harry Potter to be exact. From there it inspired me to write and pursue a career in writing. That was almost 18 year ago, so you can say that it has definitely struck me and hit hard with how powerful the written word could affect my entire life.

Q: What does literary success look like to you?

Success to me doesn’t come in the form of awards or living a life of luxury. If anything, it just looks like me living a full-time career and replacing my current income with that of writing. To me, the other stuff is great, but it’s not the success but just extra perks. Obviously I want to be able to enjoy what I am writing too, because then it just feels like empty words and false money to me. Yea, I’m picky on how I earn my money and have to feel like I deserved it.

Q: How do you select the names of your characters?

I’d say like a lot of different people do which is through those websites like 1001babynames and stuff like that. Sometimes I event take it from mythology itself. Though most of my character’s names are built around a certain culture and the names found within them. Best example is in my latest work in progress being Shadow of the Crown, the Drow all possess names that are very Japanese influenced and even their culture has that similar influence as well.

Q: If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

Don’t give up and stop procrastinating on writing. Just get out there with your butt in the seat and write already! Seriously, I was bad at procrastinating everything. Not to mention telling my younger self to be so self-conscious about her writing because it’s pretty freaking good if she would stop worrying about people who aren’t her audience caring about the books.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you?

You can learn more about me almost on all social networks. My website, Facebook page, and Twitter.

I’m always up to chat if you want to reach out to me and talk about some nerdy stuff going on.