Introducing Author Phil Penne

Dragon Soul Press is proud to present Author Phil Penne to our avid audience! Debuting through DSP with a non-fiction self-help book for when it comes to technology, more titles are sure to follow. Enjoy our interview with the author below.


 

Does writing energize or exhaust you?

      Hmmm… Going to have to go with “depends” on this one. A lot of factors come into play: my current state of mind and physical health are near the top. It also depends on what I’m writing; Non-fiction, like Geezer Tech don’t affect me one way or the other – I’m just relaying my work experiences. In fiction, writing passages that fit my personality can be energizing; writing about things out of my comfort zone tends to be more exhausting.

What is your writing Kryptonite?Phil Penne Facebook Profile Pic

      Never really thought about it, but considering the technical writing I’ve done, I’d have to say the word ‘deadline’ gives me goose bumps more than anything else.

What one thing would you give up to become a better writer?

      I’d give up my self-doubt in an instant to be a better writer, but I don’t think I’m able to… and there’s the self-doubt again.

How long on average does it take you to write a book?

My writing tends to be all over the map in terms of subject, so I can’t really give you a hard number, since different genres take varying amounts of time. “Too long” is probably the closest I can come to an answer; I tend to procrastinate and am always finding excuses to do something other than write. Sometimes the excuses are valid, other times not so much. Considering I.T. tech support was something I had done for over forty years, I finished Geezer Tech quickly, by my standards.

Do you believe in writer’s block? 

      Oh, big time! I even addressed that precise subject in one of the vignettes in my first fiction work, Forty Rabbit Holes: The Book of Daydreams. Being slightly ADD (self-diagnosed, mind you), I tend to think of plots for other books while working on my current book. Once that happens there’s a major log jam and nothing happens until I manage to clear my head. Usually photography is the panacea for that; when I’m behind the lens nothing else exists.

How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

      I’m going to include self-published under the umbrella of unpublished, so that would be four, not including two coffee table books and three books of sheet music transcribed for the Native American flute. Half finished? Well, I’m 8,000 words into my next fiction work (out of an anticipated 110,000 words). Two more are in the 2,000 word range (out of an anticipated who-knows-how-many total words). The total number of ideas bouncing around inside my skull? Carl Sagan couldn’t count that high.

What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

      Hmmm… tough one. Oddly enough, I’d have to say Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Even though it became hugely popular with the release of the movie Blade Runner in 1982, it should have been every bit as popular when it was published in 1968 – it shouldn’t have taken the movie to propel the book to fame.

If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

      In a nutshell, “Get used to rejection.”

Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

   Never really thought about it much until recently when I toyed with the idea of writing a trilogy of artfully written books with erotic overtones. The closest I came prior to that was in my book Mama Root: The Old Woman of Loop Road, where I found it necessary to pen a Shakespearean style sonnet as part of the story, and ascribed its authorship to one “Royce Voithem” – which is actually an anagram for “My other voice”.

Where can readers learn more about you?

     Probably my website. There’s a little bit of a bio there, plus insights into my photography, graphic arts, storytelling, etc. That might give people at least a thumbnail sketch of what this Phil Penne character is all about.

I also believe you can tell a lot about a person by asking them what their favorite quote is. Mine? It comes from Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s Ulysses:

I am a part of all that I have met;
Yet all experience is an arch wherethro’
Gleams that untravell’d world, whose margin fades
For ever and for ever when I move.


You can also find this author at Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Youtube, and DSP Author Page.

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